Silent Sunday: Warehoused

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8 thoughts on “Silent Sunday: Warehoused

  1. Steve has a “thing” about ramshackle broken down buildings and equipment. He loves to photograph anything rusty and vacant and forgotten. He calls it “Urban degradation” and we spend a fair bit of time in the city driving from urban degradation site to urban degradation site. Our “city” is most probably on the scale of one of your smaller sized towns to be honest but there are still some good places to go if you want to lay in a muddy puddle and photograph someones tags ;)

  2. Not a type of area I frequent in my city (for perhaps obvious reasons) but what brilliant photography; and what a view into generations past! I live in Cardiff, the capital of Wales, in the UK; the coal ship docks are gone now as are the trading halls & the warehouses. Many generations of lifestyles/trades etc gone, the South Docks area of Cardiff is now mostly a middle-class dormitory area.

  3. I just love these photos. Why in the world, I don’t know. I grew up in a small, rural town, but somehow photos of old, dilapidated factories are so eerie, in a beautiful way.. Of course, I could say the same thing about old, dilapidated barns. Thanks for sharing these!

    1. me too, great pics, when I see them, I think of the people who once worked in them, in another age, using the old technologies & I wonder what they talked about & what their lives were like. (No factory workers in my family, they were all farmers until better education came, I have lived in a city for decades, working in an office). I feel the same visiting old ruins of say, monasteries/convents, stately homes & the type of folk museum with set-ups of launderettes (before electric machines) & shops of the day, sometimes with models of people. There is a broadcast from Vienna every New Year’s Day of Strauss music, when the ballet dancers dance their way through the inter-connecting rooms, I always wonder about the lives & aspirations, hopes & dreams of those who lived in those rooms in the time of the Strauss family. Two very different classes of people but each straight-jacketed into a narrow way of life with no escape…

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