Dumpling Diplomacy

What defines a dumpling? Is it the dough that sets the category? Does the filling play a role in this determination? Would something intangible, something as abstract as cultural origin have greater influence?

This is the question that lingers after watching the comical debate play out on the final episode of Ugly Delicious, a throw down between Italian stuffed pasta versus Asian dumplings. Though the two schools of thought seem crystal clear a first, peel back the wrapper a bit and it becomes more difficult to know where to draw the line. If you put cheese inside of wonton skins, do they become ravioli? Would that classification change if they were boiled, fried, or steamed? Some will undoubtedly be offended by this question, many more will have a strong, irrepressible knee-jerk response, but what I really want to know is whether or not that makes it any less delicious.

Ultimately, that’s the whole point that David Chang is trying to make in this mock trial. The concept itself is deeply flawed and fraught with controversy, considering the immense cultural diversity that each region encompasses, but still, it made me think. How could I merge the two schools of thought into one single bundle of joy, both a peace offering and a tribute to both sides? Extending an olive branch somewhat literally, olives played an important role in the final fusion.

Italian pasta puttanesca, a bold dish redolent of garlic and punctuated by briny twangs of olives and capers inspired the tomato-based filling to these stuffed savories, but they’re all Asian in presentation. Swaddled in delicate gyoza wrappers and seared to a crispy finish on the bottom, these unconventional potstickers lay claim to no single source, but a harmonious melding of culinary techniques, flavors, and ingredients derived from the world at large. Paired with an herbed olive oil dipping sauce, the eating experience is one that defies definition. All remaining disputes will be forgotten if we could put down our proverbial axes and pick up a set of chopsticks- or a fork- instead.

These potstickers come together in a flash with Twin Dragon Gyoza Wrappers holding everything together. I’m entering this recipe into the Twin Dragons Asian Wrapper Blogger Recipe Challenge held by JSL Foods. Find more recipe inspiration on their Facebook page and Twitter feed. You can purchase JSL Foods Twin Dragon products at Albertsons, Shaw’s, Von’s, Stater Bros, Lucky’s, Food Maxx, Fred Meyer, QFC, Cub Foods, Rainbow Foods, Safeway, Associated Stores, Price Rite, Shop Rite, Winco, Price Chopper and Gelson’s!

If only true world peace was as easily attained as such deeply satisfying, savory results.

Puttanesca Potstickers

4 Tablespoons Olive Oil, Divided
4 Cloves Garlic, Minced
1 (14-Ounce) Can Fire-Roasted Diced Tomatoes
1/4 Cup Sun-Dried Tomatoes, Roughly Chopped
1/2 Cup Pitted Back Olives, Roughly Chopped
1 Tablespoon Petite Capers
1/2 Teaspoon Dried Oregano
1/4 – 1/2 Teaspoon Crushed Red Pepper Flakes
4 Ounces (1/4 Package) Extra-Firm Tofu
1/2 Cup Fresh Basil, Roughly Chopped
1 Package Twin Dragon Gyoza Wrappers

Olive Oil and Herb Dipping Sauce

2 Garlic Cloves, Finely Minced
2 Tablespoons Petite Capers
1/2 Teaspoon Dried Oregano
2 Teaspoons Fresh Rosemary, Minced
2 Teaspoons Fresh Thyme, Minced
3 Tablespoons Nutritional yeast
1/2 Teaspoon Ground Black pepper
1/2 Cup Olive Oil

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a medium saucepan over moderate heat and add the garlic. Saute until lightly browned and aromatic; about 4 – 6 minutes. Introduce the tomatoes, juice and all, along with the dried tomatoes, olives, capers, oregano, and red pepper. Thoroughly drain and crumble the tofu before adding it last, stirring to incorporate. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring frequently, until any excess liquid has evaporated. Add the fresh basil last and cool completely before proceeding.

To assemble the potstickers, take one wrapper at a time, keeping the rest of the stack covered with a lightly moistened towel to prevent them from drying out. Place a scant tablespoon of filling in the center, lightly moisten the edges with water, and fold the wrapper in half, pleating and crimping the top to seal. (Here’s a handy visual guide if you’re having trouble.) Repeat with the remaining filling and wrappers.

At this point, you can either proceed straight to cooking the dumplings, or freeze them for a later date. Freeze in a single layer on a sheet pan and store in an airtight container in the freeze for up to 2 months, if desired.

When you’re ready to heat a tablespoon of oil in a nonstick skillet over high heat. When oil is hot, place enough potstickers in the skillet to fill but not crowd the vessel, pleat-side up. Sear hard for about 1 minute before adding 2 tablespoons water in the skillet. Cover immediately and reduce the heat to medium. Cook covered until the water is evaporated and potstickers are cooked through; about 3 minutes.

Meanwhile, prepare the dipping sauce by simply mixing everything together in a small bowl.

Remove the cover and flip one potsticker to see whether the bottom side is deeply burnished and crisp. If not, continue to cook until the bottom side turns golden brown. Transfer to a plate and repeat with the remaining oil and potstickers. Serve hot with herbed dipping sauce, asap.

Makes About 50 – 60 Gyoza and 1/2 Cup Dipping Sauce

Printable Recipe

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8 thoughts on “Dumpling Diplomacy

  1. I looooove dumplings and woukd eat them anytime I get a chance. My only worry is the sodium content which is through the roof in most cases…. :(

  2. Oh wow, you are right, I don’t know how I feel about this! I do always cringe when folks call stuffed wonton wrappers, ravioli. These sound absolutely delectable, so I honestly don’t mind what they’re called. I suppose that’s the key!

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