Working for Peanuts

Grazing my way through the day, it can be hard to sit down to a proper meal. Time constraints often create an imposing barrier to reasonable meal prep, leaving me at the mercy of my pantry when hunger strikes. Granted, there are just as many instances where my only excuse is a basic, child-like craving for snack foods, conventional lunch or dinnertime fare be damned.

For anyone else affected by these same cravings, take heart in knowing that you’re not alone, and that there is a cure.

Peanut sadeko, a Nepalese appetizer that satisfies like an entree and tastes like a snack, doesn’t translate easily to a typical American eating agenda. Some call it salad, but of course there are no leafy greens and scant vegetables, so my best advice is to enjoy it with an appetite for adventure, anytime it you see fit.

Biting, lingering heat from pungent mustard oil envelops warm peanuts, mixed with a hefty dose of ginger, jalapeno, and chaat masala for a savory, spicy blend. “Sadeko,” sometimes romanized as “sandheko,” simply refers to the basic seasoning that blends these sharp, distinctive, yet somehow harmonious flavors together, infusing a wide range of recipes throughout the Himalayas. Though nontraditional, crispy roasted edamame join the party in my personal mix for a resounding cacophony of crunch in every mouthful.

Unexpected, undefinable, yet undeniably addictive, it hits all the right notes for instant gratification.

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Say Cheese!

Names, dates, phone numbers: my memory fails me on these specifics nine times out of ten, embarrassing me to no end when I’m introduced to the same person for the seventh time. The one birthday I will always remember, of all things, is for someone I’ve never even met. Amy, the inspiration for Amy’s Kitchen, shares my same birth year, making it even more astonishing to recognize over 30 years of vegetarian and vegan meals made available to the masses, all from such humble beginnings. Those frozen samosa wraps, tamale pies (RIP), and vegetable barley soups saved my life back in high school, before I could even operate a toaster without causing a conflagration.

Where so many brands have failed and folded, Amy’s Kitchen has grown in leaps and bounds, expanding their dairy-free options exponentially while still maintaining high quality standards, and an endless hunger for both adventurous flavors and down-home comfort foods. Breaking into 2020 with a boom, Amy’s Kitchen has just unleashed a new line of ooey, gooey, cheezy vegan entrées, including two pasta dishes and two Mexican-inspired options. They’re all going into regular rotation here as emergency dinners at Casa BitterSweet, but if I had to play favorites, my money would be on the Vegan Broccoli & Cheeze Bake.

I’m rather picky about my pasta, to put it lightly, and I was stunned to realize a few bites in, going back to read the label, that these noodles were gluten-free, too. Tender, chewy, springy, the texture surpasses that of most average frozen wheat options, too. There’s no sacrifice nor compromise for accommodating such a range of dietary restriction; nothing makes it into the bowl but delicious, creamy instant gratification.⁣

You really can’t improve on perfection, by definition, but you can match it on the same level in an equally compelling, yet wholly unique way. That’s where these fool-proof party starts come in.

Baked, not fried, to golden brown and crispy brilliance, this is the halfway homemade food hack that could very well become the stuff of legends. Better than mozzarella sticks, they won’t start to congeal and lose their luster the moment they hit the table. The breading ensures easy prep, no culinary skills required. Banishing greasy fingers by adding no extra oil means you could be saving your sofas- and stomachs- from unnecessary anguish later, too.

Tender spiral noodles and organic broccoli, bathed in luscious, creamy vegan cheese sauce burst forth from their crisp breaded shells, a rush of comfort and savory satisfaction in every bite. This is one unforgettable finger food that will serve you well for many happy years, too.

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Easy Brie-zy Entertaining

What’s that I hear, off in the distance? Could it be the sound of winter boots storming down the driveway? The staccato knock of knuckles against the front door? The unmistakable chime of the doorbell, ringing out as clear as day: YOUR GUESTS HAVE ARRIVED!?

Ah yes, it sounds like the holidays are here again! Trickling in slowly, gathering in greater numbers with every passing minute, the kitchen swells with sounds of merriment, laughter and banter ricocheting off the walls. Cue the music, crank the oven, and break out the appetizers; it’s time to dazzle with more than sparkling tinsel lining the hallways.

Play your cards right, and one spectacular starter will set the whole party in motion. The pros know that it’s only possible by keeping it simple, prepping ahead, and using the best ingredients. That’s why I’m dropping this show-stopping wheel of homemade vegan brie, supple and soft, crowned with the bold combination of tart raspberries and balsamic vinegar. If that doesn’t kick off the festivities with applause, at least, perhaps you’ve invited the wrong audience.

Buttery, creamy, melting at room temperature, this brie isn’t a dead-ringer for its dairy counterpoint, but it doesn’t need to imitate exactly when it can exceed that experience. Reaching into my pantry for an easy accompaniment, bottles of Alessi White Balsamic Raspberry Blush Vinegar and Alessi Raspberry Infused White Balsamic Reduction inspired this unconventional, yet compelling combination. Melding that tangy, fresh flavor with sweet whole berries in a lightly simmered compote created a heady aroma that no one could resist.

I can count on Alessi ingredients to raise the bar on everyday staples, no matter the recipe or occasion. Family owned and operated for 72 years, these essentials have stood the test of time. They’ve been stocking grocery store shelves across the country for as long as I can remember, that’s for sure. Going straight to the source reaps the greatest rewards, though, since orders over $20 ship free and no where else can you find such a wide section of authentic Italian specialties. As if that wasn’t enough, if you shop directly through Alessi.com and enter the code HANNAHK at checkout, you’ll get 15% off your order! This code is good for 1 use per customer, until December 31.

Both the cheese and chutney can be made up to a full week in advance, so there’s no need to stress on the big day. Just take off the chill as conversations warm and spirits flow. The savory wedges will melt in your mouth, and any extraneous worries will melt away. Now that’s what makes a happy holiday.

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If it Ain’t Got That Spring, Then it Don’t Mean a Thing

Fleeting warm breezes tease on cool mornings, while sporadic rays of sun manage to break through cloud cover, gently kissing still frozen earth. Tempting, taunting, spring arrives in maddening snippets too short to savor at first. Right when you begin to peel back layers of heavy sweaters and fold up thick comforters, winter rages back in with a vengeance, more brutal than before, crystallizing budding sprouts into frosted popsicles or piling on a fresh coat of ice, depending on your locale. Every time it seems certain that the seasonal shift has taken place, hopes soar high on those fresh winds of change, and crash hard like a kite with no string, back down into the forbidding frozen tundra.

For the first time in recent memory, the calendar date actually seems to align with the weather. Spring resonates through dewy grasses, shouting its arrival from the rooftops of micro gardens across the urban landscape. At least in the bay area, the changing of the guard has officially occurred, and I’m more than ready to reap the benefits.

Spring is all about fresh greens in so many forms. Tender, sweet curlicues branch out from between soft pea leaves, one of the best if underappreciated parts of the whole plant. Though it’s a tough sacrifice to cut these vines down in their youth, before pods appear bearing those toothsome green caviar, the greens themselves are a true delicacy that are worth a splurge. Typically found in Asian cuisine, stir-fried very simply with a splash of wine and a handful of garlic at the most, their full potential has yet to be realized in western culture.

Borrowing inspiration from Spanish tapas, the term “cazuela” simply indicates the terra cotta cooking vessel for the dish, much like you would refer to a tagine. Contents of that pot vary widely across countries, always encompassing some sort of vegetable, though sometimes meat as well. The version from Barcelona Restaurant, based on spinach and chickpeas, inspired my springtime spin-off.

Deceptively rich and complex but full of verdant, simple vegetables, think of it like a warm spread that falls somewhere between hummus, pea puree, and spinach dip. Masses of fresh pea leaves wilt down into a concentrated tangle, amplified by the fruit of the pods themselves with a garlicky, cumin-forward taste that will linger with each bite.

If Mother Nature remains stubbornly resistant to embracing a timely spring conversion in your area, sunflower sprouts or baby spinach might just be able to suffice in a pinch… But the best things remain for those who wait. Ask around at local farmers markets, search ethnic markets for dòu miáo (豆苗,) or head to the backyard and get growing. Though it may sound like great lengths to go for just a handful of tiny sprouts, you’re only 1 – 3 weeks away from the best taste of the season, and it won’t get any fresher than that.

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New Year’s Ball Drop

Wait, where do you think you’re going? The party isn’t over yet! Just when you thought it was safe to crawl back home in a holiday-induced stupor, ready to hibernate for the remainder of winter, New Year’s looms large on the horizon with another round of festive demands. Still recovering from Christmas, and maybe even Hanukkah at that, it can be a challenge to summon enough enthusiasm for the final day of the year. It typically ends in an anticlimactic countdown at midnight and much more booze than food; never a good omen for the start of any resolution.

No matter how worn and weary from this season of relentless merriment, we can still do better. Why just watch the ball drop on TV when you can fortify yourself with balls of a more savory sort?

It’s been many years, if not decades since I last encountered these classic appetizers, yet they come back to me in flashbulb memories of parties past. Was it my mom in the kitchen, rolling up mounds of greens and cheese by the dozen, or someone else entirely? Though the details elude me, I do remember being swayed by their robust garlic flavor, even in my early days of hating vegetables.

Look, I know it’s getting late and we could all use a break, but this last request is an easy one! Let your food processor do the heavy lifting, throw the whole lot in the oven, and finish on a strong note. 2018 has been full of crazy twists and turns, but I can promise you that the conclusion will ultimately be gratifying when these bite-sized balls drop, even if you make it an early night.

Yield: Makes 24 - 30 Balls

Garlicky Spinach Balls

Garlicky Spinach Balls

Robust garlic flavor shines throughout each bite of these crowd-pleasing appetizers.

Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Total Time 55 minutes

Ingredients

  • 6 Slices (About 7.5 Ounces Total) Sandwich Bread, Slightly Stale or Lightly Toasted
  • 1/4 Cup Toasted Pine Nuts
  • 1/3 Cup Nutritional Yeast
  • 1 Head Roasted Garlic
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Salt
  • 1/4 Teaspoon Black Pepper
  • 2 Cups (About 10 Ounces) Frozen Spinach, Thawed and Drained
  • 1 Tablespoon Fresh Parsley
  • 1/4 Cup Pumpkin Puree or Leftover Mashed Potatoes
  • 3 Tablespoons Olive Oil

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees and lightly grease a baking sheet.
  2. Roughly tear the bread into smaller pieces and place them in your food processor, along with the pine nuts. Pulse until broken down into a coarse meal. Add in all of the remaining ingredients and pulse to combine, chopping the greens especially well but leaving the mixture with a bit of texture. You don’t want a perfectly smooth puree like baby food here.
  3. Scoop out a heaping tablespoon for each portion and use lightly moistened hands to roll them into round balls. Place on your prepared sheet and bake for 30 – 40 minutes, until dark green in color and firm to the touch. Let cool for at least 15 minutes before serving; enjoy warm or at room temperature.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

30

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 63Total Fat: 3gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 2gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 125mgCarbohydrates: 7gFiber: 2gSugar: 1gProtein: 3g

Dumpling Diplomacy

What defines a dumpling? Is it the dough that sets the category? Does the filling play a role in this determination? Would something intangible, something as abstract as cultural origin have greater influence?

This is the question that lingers after watching the comical debate play out on the final episode of Ugly Delicious, a throw down between Italian stuffed pasta versus Asian dumplings. Though the two schools of thought seem crystal clear a first, peel back the wrapper a bit and it becomes more difficult to know where to draw the line. If you put cheese inside of wonton skins, do they become ravioli? Would that classification change if they were boiled, fried, or steamed? Some will undoubtedly be offended by this question, many more will have a strong, irrepressible knee-jerk response, but what I really want to know is whether or not that makes it any less delicious.

Ultimately, that’s the whole point that David Chang is trying to make in this mock trial. The concept itself is deeply flawed and fraught with controversy, considering the immense cultural diversity that each region encompasses, but still, it made me think. How could I merge the two schools of thought into one single bundle of joy, both a peace offering and a tribute to both sides? Extending an olive branch somewhat literally, olives played an important role in the final fusion.

Italian pasta puttanesca, a bold dish redolent of garlic and punctuated by briny twangs of olives and capers inspired the tomato-based filling to these stuffed savories, but they’re all Asian in presentation. Swaddled in delicate gyoza wrappers and seared to a crispy finish on the bottom, these unconventional potstickers lay claim to no single source, but a harmonious melding of culinary techniques, flavors, and ingredients derived from the world at large. Paired with an herbed olive oil dipping sauce, the eating experience is one that defies definition. All remaining disputes will be forgotten if we could put down our proverbial axes and pick up a set of chopsticks- or a fork- instead.

These potstickers come together in a flash with Twin Dragon Gyoza Wrappers holding everything together. I’m entering this recipe into the Twin Dragons Asian Wrapper Blogger Recipe Challenge held by JSL Foods. Find more recipe inspiration on their Facebook page and Twitter feed. You can purchase JSL Foods Twin Dragon products at Albertsons, Shaw’s, Von’s, Stater Bros, Lucky’s, Food Maxx, Fred Meyer, QFC, Cub Foods, Rainbow Foods, Safeway, Associated Stores, Price Rite, Shop Rite, Winco, Price Chopper and Gelson’s!

If only true world peace was as easily attained as such deeply satisfying, savory results.

Yield: Makes About 50 – 60 Gyoza and 1/2 Cup Dipping Sauce

Puttanesca Potstickers

Puttanesca Potstickers

Italian pasta puttanesca, a bold dish redolent of garlic and punctuated by briny twangs of olives and capers inspired the tomato-based filling to these stuffed savories, but they’re all Asian in presentation. Swaddled in delicate gyoza wrappers and seared to a crispy finish on the bottom, these unconventional potstickers lay claim to no single source, but a harmonious melding of culinary techniques, flavors, and ingredients derived from the world at large. Paired with an herbed olive oil dipping sauce, the eating experience is one that defies definition.

Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 15 minutes

Ingredients

Puttanesca Potstickers

  • 4 Tablespoons Olive Oil, Divided
  • 4 Cloves Garlic, Minced
  • 1 (14-Ounce) Can Fire-Roasted Diced Tomatoes
  • 1/4 Cup Sun-Dried Tomatoes, Roughly Chopped
  • 1/2 Cup Pitted Back Olives, Roughly Chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon Petite Capers
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Dried Oregano
  • 1/4 – 1/2 Teaspoon Crushed Red Pepper Flakes
  • 4 Ounces (1/4 Package) Extra-Firm Tofu
  • 1/2 Cup Fresh Basil, Roughly Chopped
  • 1 Package Twin Dragon Gyoza Wrappers

Olive Oil and Herb Dipping Sauce

  • 2 Garlic Cloves, Finely Minced
  • 2 Tablespoons Petite Capers
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Dried Oregano
  • 2 Teaspoons Fresh Rosemary, Minced
  • 2 Teaspoons Fresh Thyme, Minced
  • 3 Tablespoons Nutritional yeast
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Ground Black pepper
  • 1/2 Cup Olive Oil

Instructions

  1. Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a medium saucepan over moderate heat and add the garlic. Saute until lightly browned and aromatic; about 4 – 6 minutes. Introduce the tomatoes, juice and all, along with the dried tomatoes, olives, capers, oregano, and red pepper. Thoroughly drain and crumble the tofu before adding it last, stirring to incorporate. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring frequently, until any excess liquid has evaporated. Add the fresh basil last and cool completely before proceeding.
  2. To assemble the potstickers, take one wrapper at a time, keeping the rest of the stack covered with a lightly moistened towel to prevent them from drying out. Place a scant tablespoon of filling in the center, lightly moisten the edges with water, and fold the wrapper in half, pleating and crimping the top to seal. (Here’s a handy visual guide if you’re having trouble.) Repeat with the remaining filling and wrappers.
  3. At this point, you can either proceed straight to cooking the dumplings, or freeze them for a later date. Freeze in a single layer on a sheet pan and store in an airtight container in the freeze for up to 2 months, if desired.
  4. When you’re ready to heat a tablespoon of oil in a nonstick skillet over high heat. When oil is hot, place enough potstickers in the skillet to fill but not crowd the vessel, pleat-side up. Sear hard for about 1 minute before adding 2 tablespoons water in the skillet. Cover immediately and reduce the heat to medium. Cook covered until the water is evaporated and potstickers are cooked through; about 3 minutes.
  5. Meanwhile, prepare the dipping sauce by simply mixing everything together in a small bowl.
  6. Remove the cover and flip one potsticker to see whether the bottom side is deeply burnished and crisp. If not, continue to cook until the bottom side turns golden brown. Transfer to a plate and repeat with the remaining oil and potstickers. Serve hot with herbed dipping sauce, asap.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

10

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 188Total Fat: 18gSaturated Fat: 2gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 15gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 147mgCarbohydrates: 6gFiber: 2gSugar: 1gProtein: 3g
All nutritional information presented within this site are intended for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and any nutritional information on BitterSweetBlog.com should only be used as a general guideline. This information is provided as a courtesy and there is no guarantee that the information will be completely accurate. Even though I try to provide accurate nutritional information to the best of my ability, these figures should still be considered estimates.