All For One, One For Allulose

Light as air, crisp, and sweet, the best sort of meringue is one that is so ephemeral, it barely even casts a shadow. Disappearing instantly into a whisper of vanilla, a kiss of marshmallow, a whole batch could melt away in the blink of an eye, with or without the assistance of a a second eater. Made of little more than aquafaba and sugar, these pristine white clouds might have well descended straight down from heaven. How could a food so divine, so pure, possibly become further enlightened? Try switching out the sweetener.

A feat of modern baking, an eggless, sugarless meringue is not only conceivable, but is incredibly gratifying both to make and devour. This edible marvel is possible all because of allulose.

Allulose is a naturally occurring monosaccharide, just like glucose (sugar found in blood) and fructose (sugar found in fruit.) It’s simply harder to find, popping up in minute quantities in a very limited range of foods, such as figs, raisins, and jackfruit, although it’s typically produced on a commercial scale from corn. It’s also more difficult for the human body to process as energy, endowing it with a remarkably low caloric impact. While sweetness is subjective, the general consensus is that allulose is only about 70% as sweet as granulated white sugar.

Inspired by the Keystone Pantry Allulose Blogger Recipe Challenge, my goal was to create a winning combination of flavor and flair, of course, while putting this innovative ingredient to the ultimate test. In a recipe where there’s nowhere to hide, could allulose stand at firm peaks, before and after the battery of the oven’s blast?

If not for the photographic evidence, even I would have a hard time believing this wildly successful operation, long after the subjects have been annihilated. Personal pavlovas, miniature rafts of meringue carrying precious cargo in the form of whipped coconut cream and fresh golden raspberries, are guaranteed to drop jaws as they float on by. Completely allergen-free, diabetic-friendly, and universally appealing, I can think of no dessert more angelic. Not even old-fashioned angel food cake can hold a candle to this sinless sweet treat.

For more inspiration and information about allulose, check out Lang’s Chocolate and Keystone Pantry products on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Angel Nests

Meringue Nests:

1/3 Cup Aquafaba, Chilled
2/3 Cup Keystone Pantry Allulose
1 Teaspoon Tapioca Starch
1/2 Teaspoon Cream of Tartar
1/8 Teaspoon Xanthan Gum
1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract

Whipped Topping and Garnish:

1 (14-Ounce) Can Full-Fat Coconut Milk, Chilled
1 Tablespoon Keystone Pantry Allulose
1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract
1 Cup Fresh Berries
Edible Glitter (Optional)

Preheat your oven to 250 degrees and line two baking sheets with parchment paper or silpats.

Pour the aquafaba into the bowl of your stand mixer and begin beating on moderate speed with the whisk attachment installed. Meanwhile, in a separate bowl, combine the allulose, tapioca starch, cream of tartar, and xanthan gum, stirring thoroughly to integrate all the dry goods.

Once the aquafaba has built up a sturdy froth and almost doubled in size, increase the speed to high, and very slowly begin to sift the dry mixture into the mixer bowl while the motor runs. Add just about a tablespoon at a time, to allow the foam structure to develop. Continue to beat at full speed for until stiff, glossy peaks form and can hold their shape. This could take 10 – 15 minutes in all. Fold in the vanilla last, being very gentle so as not to pop that fine matrix of bubbles you just worked so hard to build.

Transfer the meringue to a piping bag fitted with a large star tip. Pipe out round bases about 2 – 3 inches in diameter, building up the outer walls with an extra layer of meringue, creating a nest with space in the center for filling. Repeat until the meringue is used up.

Bake at 250 degrees for two hours before rotating the sheets and dropping the temperature down to 200 degrees. Bake for an additional 2 – 2 1/2 hours, until evenly golden all over, dry to the touch, but just slightly soft still. Turn off the heat, leave the nests in the oven, and leave the door ajar. Let cool completely before proceeding.

To make the coconut whipped cream, carefully open the chilled can of coconut milk, being sure not to shake it, and scoop off the top layer of thick coconut cream. Save the watery liquid left behind for another recipe (itโ€™s great in curries or soups!) Place the coconut cream in the bowl of your stand mixer and install the whisk attachment. Whip on high speed for about 3 minutes before slowly beginning to sprinkle in the allulose, just a little bit at a time. Continue beating the mixture for up to 10 minutes, until light and fluffy. Finally, fold in the vanilla extract; keep refrigerated until ready to use.

When ready to serve, spoon dollops of whipped coconut cream into the center of each nest. Top with fresh berries and just a touch of edible glitter, if desired. Eat immediately, before they float away!

Makes 8 – 12 Personal Pavlovas

Printable Recipe

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10 thoughts on “All For One, One For Allulose

  1. Angel nest looks stunning & tempting ! It is really a wonderful feeling to make guilt-free meringue using one of the best alternatives for sugar.

    1. Thank you! I was definitely impressed by the results, since not all alternative sweeteners create such satisfying results.

  2. Can you tell me about the texture? I’ve tried making meringues with allulose (and egg white) and all 3 batches came out much too brown and very rubbery. Not crisp and light. I adjusted oven temp and time in the oven without success. For me, sugar is the issue, not the egg whites, as I’m not vegan. But I’m happy to try new things.

    1. They did brown quite a bit more than anticipated, as you can probably tell from the photo, but by baking them low and slow for a very long time, I was able to get a nice crisp texture. Though the meringue seemed soft when I took it out of the oven, it firmed up perfect once completely cool. Of course, they soften again quite quickly when topped with whipped cream, but what sort of meringue doesn’t? :) Good luck with your sugar-free experiments!

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