Pineapple Express

Reaching for the heavy brass door knocker standing guard at the entry of my childhood home, I never once questioned why it was fashioned after a pineapple. Design flourishes were not the first priority for the architects who constructed this traditional, simple New England colonial; it could have been any other shape, but of all the possible symbols to display to guests, the first thing that they grasp upon arrival, was this tropical fruit.

Representing both status and hospitality in one fell swoop, the prestige of the pineapple is often credited to Christopher Columbus, who brought them back from his voyages as an offering to the Spanish King Ferdi­nand II. Since it was the only edible offering that survived the trip intact, it was the clear winner amongst the bundle of rotting tomatoes, tobacco, and pumpkins. That initial exoticism, impressive appearance, and incomparable sweetness vaulted it to the highest ranks. To have such wealth that you could offer these esteemed specimens freely to visitors instantly spoke of your prosperity, and lightly veiled bragging in the form of faux-generosity.

The symbolism stuck. Scarcity is a thing of the past, but their popularity continues to soar. Now one of the most popular produce picks on the market, retailers predict a pineapple boom is still to come, while the current culture has found all new meaning in the spiky fruits. The full weight of that multilayered meaning may not hit every time we slice into the yellow flesh, peel away the harsh, spiky exterior, and sink our teeth into the tangy fibers. Though the pineapple still enjoys a place of honor in, and outside, many homes, the place where it’s most welcome is the kitchen.

Roasting and caramelizing cubes of pineapple brings out a whole new depth of flavor, while still maintaining its characteristic brightness, and simultaneously concentrating its inherent sweetness. Though it would be no sacrifice to simply eat the results plain, perhaps with a dollop of whipped cream to fancy things up, I was craving a bite of comfort in the form of pound cake. Simple, homey, and undemanding, it really is the ideal house guest, and ideal for serving visitors in turn. The dense, tender, moist crumb sparkles with tropical undertones, enriched by coconut milk and spiked by just a hint of ginger.

Christopher Columbus committed countless terrible, unthinkable crimes in his grand adventures, but at least this one small contribution to history is one we can look back on with pride. The pineapple has earned its place of honor, and continues to flourish in ways the explorer could have never imagined.

Roasted Pineapple Pound Cake

1 3/4 Cups All-Purpose Flour
1 Cup Granulated Sugar
1 Teaspoon Baking Soda
1/2 Teaspoon Baking Powder
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
1/2 Teaspoon Ground Ginger
1 1/2 Cups Roasted Pineapple Puree*
1/2 Cup Avocado Oil or Olive Oil
1/2 Cup Full-Fat Coconut Milk
1 1/2 Teaspoons Apple Cider Vinegar
1 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract

*To roast the pineapple, peel, core, and dice the fruit before spreading the piece evenly inside a casserole or baking dish. A good amount of juice will be expressed so you need a vessel with fairly high sides. Bake at 400 degrees, stirring every 15 minutes or so, for 60 – 70 minutes until caramelized. Cool completely before tossing into a blender to puree.

**If you have leftover puree, you can whip up a quick glaze by stirring in brown sugar and a pinch of cinnamon to taste and cooking it over the stove until the granules dissolve. Drizzle or slather on top of the cooled loaf as desired.

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease and flour an 8 x 4-inch loaf pan and set aside.

In a large bowl, stir together the flour, white sugar, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and ginger. Add the pineapple puree, oil, coconut milk, vinegar, and vanilla, mixing thoroughly until the batter is fairly smooth. It’s perfectly fine to leave a few lumps, rather than risk over-mixing and creating a tough crumb.

Bake for 60 – 75 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. You may want to tent the loaf with foil half-way through the baking process if you fear it will turn out too dark. Remove foil as soon as it comes out of the oven and let cool in the pan for at least 30 minutes. Turn out onto a cooling rack to finish cooling, and serve either warm or at room temperature.

Makes 8 – 10 Servings

Printable Recipe

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All For One, One For Allulose

Light as air, crisp, and sweet, the best sort of meringue is one that is so ephemeral, it barely even casts a shadow. Disappearing instantly into a whisper of vanilla, a kiss of marshmallow, a whole batch could melt away in the blink of an eye, with or without the assistance of a a second eater. Made of little more than aquafaba and sugar, these pristine white clouds might have well descended straight down from heaven. How could a food so divine, so pure, possibly become further enlightened? Try switching out the sweetener.

A feat of modern baking, an eggless, sugarless meringue is not only conceivable, but is incredibly gratifying both to make and devour. This edible marvel is possible all because of allulose.

Allulose is a naturally occurring monosaccharide, just like glucose (sugar found in blood) and fructose (sugar found in fruit.) It’s simply harder to find, popping up in minute quantities in a very limited range of foods, such as figs, raisins, and jackfruit, although it’s typically produced on a commercial scale from corn. It’s also more difficult for the human body to process as energy, endowing it with a remarkably low caloric impact. While sweetness is subjective, the general consensus is that allulose is only about 70% as sweet as granulated white sugar.

Inspired by the Keystone Pantry Allulose Blogger Recipe Challenge, my goal was to create a winning combination of flavor and flair, of course, while putting this innovative ingredient to the ultimate test. In a recipe where there’s nowhere to hide, could allulose stand at firm peaks, before and after the battery of the oven’s blast?

If not for the photographic evidence, even I would have a hard time believing this wildly successful operation, long after the subjects have been annihilated. Personal pavlovas, miniature rafts of meringue carrying precious cargo in the form of whipped coconut cream and fresh golden raspberries, are guaranteed to drop jaws as they float on by. Completely allergen-free, diabetic-friendly, and universally appealing, I can think of no dessert more angelic. Not even old-fashioned angel food cake can hold a candle to this sinless sweet treat.

For more inspiration and information about allulose, check out Lang’s Chocolate and Keystone Pantry products on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Angel Nests

Meringue Nests:

1/3 Cup Aquafaba, Chilled
2/3 Cup Keystone Pantry Allulose
1 Teaspoon Tapioca Starch
1/2 Teaspoon Cream of Tartar
1/8 Teaspoon Xanthan Gum
1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract

Whipped Topping and Garnish:

1 (14-Ounce) Can Full-Fat Coconut Milk, Chilled
1 Tablespoon Keystone Pantry Allulose
1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract
1 Cup Fresh Berries
Edible Glitter (Optional)

Preheat your oven to 250 degrees and line two baking sheets with parchment paper or silpats.

Pour the aquafaba into the bowl of your stand mixer and begin beating on moderate speed with the whisk attachment installed. Meanwhile, in a separate bowl, combine the allulose, tapioca starch, cream of tartar, and xanthan gum, stirring thoroughly to integrate all the dry goods.

Once the aquafaba has built up a sturdy froth and almost doubled in size, increase the speed to high, and very slowly begin to sift the dry mixture into the mixer bowl while the motor runs. Add just about a tablespoon at a time, to allow the foam structure to develop. Continue to beat at full speed for until stiff, glossy peaks form and can hold their shape. This could take 10 – 15 minutes in all. Fold in the vanilla last, being very gentle so as not to pop that fine matrix of bubbles you just worked so hard to build.

Transfer the meringue to a piping bag fitted with a large star tip. Pipe out round bases about 2 – 3 inches in diameter, building up the outer walls with an extra layer of meringue, creating a nest with space in the center for filling. Repeat until the meringue is used up.

Bake at 250 degrees for two hours before rotating the sheets and dropping the temperature down to 200 degrees. Bake for an additional 2 – 2 1/2 hours, until evenly golden all over, dry to the touch, but just slightly soft still. Turn off the heat, leave the nests in the oven, and leave the door ajar. Let cool completely before proceeding.

To make the coconut whipped cream, carefully open the chilled can of coconut milk, being sure not to shake it, and scoop off the top layer of thick coconut cream. Save the watery liquid left behind for another recipe (it’s great in curries or soups!) Place the coconut cream in the bowl of your stand mixer and install the whisk attachment. Whip on high speed for about 3 minutes before slowly beginning to sprinkle in the allulose, just a little bit at a time. Continue beating the mixture for up to 10 minutes, until light and fluffy. Finally, fold in the vanilla extract; keep refrigerated until ready to use.

When ready to serve, spoon dollops of whipped coconut cream into the center of each nest. Top with fresh berries and just a touch of edible glitter, if desired. Eat immediately, before they float away!

Makes 8 – 12 Personal Pavlovas

Printable Recipe

Poached Trade

At their bare essentials, all holidays are based around eating and drinking to some degree, but none more so than Thanksgiving. In fact, it’s the main event! Without the gluttonous, butter-soaked spread, it would be just another family meal. Our excuse is that we’re merely celebrating the great bounty we’re so fortunate to receive, but somewhere along the line, it becomes a battle between man and sweatpants, seeing which will give under the pressure first.

Today, I would like to offer you the antidote to that over-the-top indulgence, in the form of a persimmon. Elegant simplicity defines this plate; more of a procedure than a full recipe, the most essential step is one not written in the instructions. Start with only the very best fruit, or don’t bother starting at all.

I would never suggest that such a humble dessert, delicious as it may be, could ever replace the traditional slab of pumpkin or pecan pie. Rather, consider each one a sweet little snack that’s something extra special for the occasion. Serve these dainty orange orbs midday to stave off that familiar, gnawing hunger while dinner slowly roasts to prevent the inevitable frenzied binge. Alternatively, save them for the following day when those sticky, crumbly, half-eaten pies aren’t nearly so appealing.

Poached Persimmons

5 Fuyu Persimmons, Stemmed and Peeled
3 Cups Pineapple Juice
2 Tablespoons Dark Rum
2 Inches Fresh Ginger, Sliced
1 Vanilla Bean, Split
Zest of 1 Orange, Peeled Off in Strips
2 Tablespoons Cornstarch

Whipped Ginger Fluff:

1/4 Cup Aquafaba
1/2 Cup Granulated Sugar
3/4 Teaspoon Ground Ginger
1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract

5 Tablespoons Toasted Pistachios, for Garnish

Core out the persimmons, removing the calyxes, and peel. Place them in a medium saucepan along with the pineapple juice, rum, fresh ginger, vanilla bean, and orange zest. Bring the liquid up to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover, and gently cook for 20 – 30 minutes, until the fruits are fork-tender.

Remove the persimmons with a slotted spoon, leaving the excess poaching liquid behind in the pan. Remove and discard the ginger pieces, spent vanilla bean, and orange peel. Whisk in the cornstarch and return it to the heat. Bring the mixture back to a boil, whisking periodically, until thickened. Set aside.

When you’re ready to make the fluff, begin whipping the aquafaba in your stand mixer on low. Gradually increase the speed all the way to the highest setting and slowly begin adding the sugar and ginger together. Once incorporated, add in the vanilla. Continue whipping for about 10 minutes, until light and fluffy.

To serve, spoon a dollop of the ginger fluff on top of each persimmon and top with a tablespoon of the pistachios. Divide the sauce equally between the plates and enjoy warm.

Makes 5 Servings

Printable Recipe

Silent Saturday: Berried Treasure



In case you’re hungry for some edible precious gems of your own, I have a little gift to at least whet your appetite. Click around and you’ll find that the second image will expand into a full-sized wallpaper, which can be downloaded to enjoy as your desktop wallpaper. Simply right click the larger version, select “Set as Desktop Background,” and choose the “Stretch” option to best fit to your screen.