BitterSweet

An Obsession with All Things Handmade and Home-Cooked

What’s in a Name?

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One name is pretty standard baggage, if not the bare minimum for informal identification. Whether you’re a fan of your moniker or not, it sure beats yelling out “Hey, you! You with the face!” to command attention from friends and family. We all have at least one good name, and often two, perhaps three, and even a nickname for closer confidants. However, the web of casual connections grows increasingly tangled from there, when a seemingly endless stream of unrelated aliases all point in the same direction. What kind of secrets are hidden behind each different title? Where did all those names come from, and why did they keep relabeling the exact same item?

Sea foam, fairy food, hokey pokey, honeycomb, sponge candy- There could very well be more pseudonyms that I’ve missed, well concealed by this cunning candy. This vintage sweet had taken on a new assumed name with each community of unsuspecting bakers. None were troubled enough to ask many questions, so utterly enchanted by its signature matrix of sugary bubbles, forever frozen at the hard-crack stage, that all other concerns were quickly abandoned.

Though I set out on a mission to uncover the truth, that cause fell by the wayside as I cooked and caramelized, stirred and stewed, bubbled, boiled, and crystallized my very own sweet mystery. If anything, the kitchen enigma I created was even darker, more powerful than the old fashioned candies of yore. Crisp foamy craters redolent of chocolate define this newest incarnation, possessing almost as many forms of cacao as its storied names. There’s cocoa and dark chocolate of course, and cacao nibs for extra crunch, but the real secret ingredient here is chocolate extract. Nothing else is able to convey such a depth of flavor in this fragile ratio of sugars and liquids without collapsing the delicate framework of airy perforations.

I’m no closer to uncovering the true indentity of this culinary chameleon… But I do understand why so many before me have fallen for such a sweet devil without question. Now that I’ve given it yet another name to contend with, the waters of history grow murkier, tinted with the all-consuming powers of chocolate, but that’s far from a bad thing. What’s in a name, anyway?

This post was made possible thanks to Rodelle and their superlative cacao contributions.

Quadruple Chocolate Honeycomb

1 Cup Granulated Sugar
1 Tablespoon Agave Nectar
5 Tablespoons Water, Divided
1 Teaspoon White Vinegar
2 Tablespoons Cocoa Powder
1 Teaspoon Chocolate Extract
2 1/2 Teaspoons Baking Soda
2 Ounces Dark Chocolate, Finely Chopped
1 Tablespoon Cacao Nibs

Line an 8 x 8-inch square baking dish with parchment paper and lightly grease. It doesn’t need to fit perfectly inside the pan, as long as it will cover the bottom and sides without any holes for the liquid candy to escape through.

Combine the sugar, agave, 4 tablespoons of the water, and vinegar in a medium saucepan. Stir just to moisten all of the sugar and place over medium heat. Swirl the pan gently to mix the ingredients as the sugar slowly melts, but avoid stirring from this point forward to prevent premature crystallization.

Meanwhile, mix together the remaining tablespoon of water, cocoa powder, and chocolate extract in a small dish; set aside.

Cook until the mixture caramelized and reaches 300 – 310 degrees, also known as the hard crack stage in candy-making terminology, and remove the pan from the heat. Things will move very quickly from here, so be on your toes. Vigorously stir in the cocoa paste along with the baking soda, allowing the mixture to froth and foam violently. Immediately transfer the liquid candy mixture to your prepared baking dish but do not spread or smooth it down. Allow it to settle naturally to maintain the structure of fine bubbles trapped within.

Let cool for at least 1 hour until fully set. To finish, melt the the dark chocolate in a microwave-safe dish, heating at intervals of 30 seconds and stirring thoroughly in between each one, until completely smooth. Pour over the top and spread it evenly across the surface. Sprinkle with cacao nibs and let rest until solidified. Break the candy into pieces and enjoy.

Sadly, it doesn’t keep well for more than a two or three days at room temperature, even when sealed in an air-tight container, so enjoy without delay!

Printable Recipe

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Author: Hannah (BitterSweet)

Author of My Sweet Vegan, Vegan Desserts, Vegan a la Mode, and Easy as Vegan Pie.

14 thoughts on “What’s in a Name?

  1. Whatever you call it, it looks yummy and so chocolate-y!

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  2. Seriously delicious looking Ms Hannah. It’s almost time to start thinking about lighting Brunhilda again for our extended winter and I think that she could cope with assisting me to cook this delicious treat. Cheers for the excellent share :)

    Liked by 1 person

  3. that looks like a really delicious treat to have…right about now :) thank you for sharing

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  4. Wow, this looks like chocolate perfection, something that would be fun for spring parties. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Of course, I need to first give huge credit to you for coming up with and creating this culinary masterpiece that I so wish to make and taste someday soon.

    But as special as the honeycomb looks, I was truly enchanted by your written description of the treat and the introduction leading up to it. Please always keep writing! You have a wonderful way with words. Thank you! <3

    Liked by 1 person

    • You are just the absolute sweetest; this comment truly makes my heart sing. I was actually feeling kind of down on this post because I got some (in-person) criticism that it was over-written. I’m so happy that you disagree! ❤

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  6. No way – this is incredible! You are so very creative and talented. I am so excited about this recipe!!!

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  7. I need to try this; I love honeycomb!

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  8. A rose by any other name would smell (or taste) as sweet. :-)

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  9. Pingback: Quadruple Chocolate Honeycomb Candy - Yum Goggle

  10. That looks incredible and very similar to something I ate as a kid in England, minus the the vegan :) Definitely must try this.

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  11. Yummy! Great combination of ingredients!

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  12. Pingback: 9 Vegan Chocolate Recipes Because CHOCOLATE! » Vegan Food Lover

  13. Pingback: Beat The Stress Of Everyday Living With Gardening | Gardening With Flowers And Plants

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