BitterSweet

Sweet Musings with a Bitterly Sharp Wit

Shell Shocked

11 Comments

Whole coconuts are a luxurious culinary delight as much as they are potentially lethal weapons. Yes, you read that correctly. The humble brown-husked coconut, now fully immersed in popular culture and ubiquitous in even the most basic mainstream grocery stores, is ripe with potential… To maim or seriously injure the irreverent home cook. You’ve survived the harvest, cleared from the danger of falling coconuts that sometimes fall like bombs on the heads of unsuspecting beach-goers, but freed from the tree, that rock hard husk takes on an all new means of attack. If I were to add up all the cuts, gashes, bruises, and scrapes I’ve personally accumulated over the years of failed attempts to break into the delicious white flesh within, let’s just say it wouldn’t be a pretty picture.

In spite of it all, I keep on coming back for round after round of punishment. It was only after a sleepless night of internet searches that I thought to investigate a better way to get my coconut meat and eat it, too. Turns out, there is a trick to it. Just whack the damn thing. Seriously.

Put away the steel spikes, hammers, rubber mallets, machetes, and any other heavy artillery you thought was needed to break into those spherical fortresses. Just hit the coconut with the blunt side of a heavy knife a few times, all around the center, until it cracks cleanly into two perfect, equal halves. Catch the water in the bowl underneath and have yourself a victory toast.

With this radical new approach, I have all the coconut I can possibly eat. After drinking the water and using the meat to make coconut butter and coconut flour, I was left with the empty shells.

Nothing goes to waste around here, though, so they too became the focus of my restless mind. For the avid crafter and food photographer, what could be better than a brand new set of beautiful, organic bowls? The most difficult part of the project is sanding away the rough hairs on the outside. Once clean and fairly smooth, even out the edge just so that it’s not sharp, but allow some of the character of the coconut to remain. Strive for wabi-sabi aesthetics, not perfection.

You could stop right there and seal the deal with a food-safe enamel, or go over it first with a bold splash of colored paint. I went with a bit of glitz and glamor for this set, spraying the interior with gold before touching up the exterior with a high-contrast black matte. I know there will be many more where these came from, so the opportunities to unleash new color combinations will be endless!

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Author: Hannah (BitterSweet)

Author of My Sweet Vegan, Vegan Desserts, Vegan a la Mode, and Easy as Vegan Pie.

11 thoughts on “Shell Shocked

  1. Stewie enjoyed this. He wants some coconut!

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  2. Coconuts are like hens teeth here in rural Northern Tasmania but you know what? I now think I want to grow one! Watch this space…

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  4. What a clever girl Hannah you are! Nothing waste in your hands. I love your idea to paint the inside with gold, beautiful! But scrubbing the outer side really a hard work. Can’t imagine how you did it? Have you notice that on one side of the top, you’ll find 3 little dimples there. Use a sharp tool to poke it, the coconut water will come out easily. That’s my hubby taught me! :)

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  5. So pretty, the gold inside makes it look all fancy. :-)

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  6. that’s a really clever way to give coconuts new life. I now want to go out and find a coconut shell just to pretty it up!

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  7. Such a pretty and fun use, perfect for a festive beach decor and fun project. Thanks!

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  8. Pingback: A Lovely Bunch of Coconuts | BitterSweet

  9. Pingback: 50 Cool DIY Projects That Can Make Your Home More Beautiful – Greensboro Baths

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