Wholly Macaroni

I couldn’t shake the question out of my head. It ran loops around my brain, echoing off the walls of my skull. Surely, there were more important matters to consider, but no. All I could think about was cheese. Mac and cheese, to be precise. It suddenly struck me that many years had passed since I revisited my previous gold standard for Stove Top-Style Macaroni and Cheese, and wondered if it would still hold up to scrutiny.

Considering the great strides that dairy-free foods have made since then, the bar had been raised to lofty heights I could have never imagined back in the day, toiling over the stove with little more than memories of the blue box to light my path. Yes, indeed, it was still good stuff… But it could certainly be better.

A few tiny tweaks make a world of difference. It’s all about incorporating the subtle umami nuances and sharp bite that a good aged cheddar might impart, but nothing earth-shaking that would come as a wild departure from the norm. Just a bit more finesse, some higher-quality ingredients, and a better understanding of the alchemical changes that flavors undergo with varying temperature and time.

Toeing the line between healthy and indulgent, the new and improved sauce introduces a handful of red lentils for body and viscosity, with the side benefit of adding extra protein and fiber into the mix. At the same time, a fearless dose of vegan butter creates that inimitable velvety texture also known as kokumi, enhancing and amplifying flavors, much like salt. Nutritional yeast is essential, of course, but joining it in savory harmony is a dash of miso, lending a greater depth of umami flavor in every cheesy, creamy bite.

Yes, it’s a bit more involved than tearing open a packet of dried dairy-derived mystery powder, but there’s no going back once you taste the difference.

Continue reading “Wholly Macaroni”

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The Straight Dough(p)

It was only a matter of time. After releasing a glorious vegan version of their infamous cookie dough ice cream, Ben & Jerry’s has now unveiled the next level of dough indulgence upon the world. Joining the previously limited run of “just the chunks,” vegans will soon see a variation with their names on it appearing in grocery stores and scoop shops nationwide.

This is the real deal; the straight dough(p). Cylindrical extrusions exactly like you would see rolling down factory conveyor belts, destined for an unceremonious ice cream burial. Now, they’ve been freed of that typical, undistinguished fate for a glorious full feature. No longer the sidekick but the true hero, every nuance of their buttery, brown sugar sweetness can be properly appreciated. Never before have I tasted anything so closely matched to the flavors of homemade dough without reaching right into the bowl of my stand mixer.

Suddenly, I’m three years old again, standing on a chair to see over the tiled kitchen counter while my mom prepares cookies. Stretching to reach the very edge of the beater, I surreptitiously swipe tiny morsels of soft batter, one after another, letting the flavors explode across my palate and slowly dissipate before going in for another bit. Each stolen taste was just enough to flood my senses with the slightly grainy texture of undissolved sugar and flour, subtly balanced salted edge, and deeply satisfying richness. Stealthy, I was not, but my mom charitably humored my advances, pretending to be engaged with very complicated oven calibration every now and then while I made my moves.

Like the flashbulb of an antique camera, the memory fades off into black, and just like that, the bag is empty, too.

Ben & Jerry’s, take another bow. This is a completely faultless edible masterpiece by any standards. If you’ve ever craved raw cookie dough, this is what you’ve wanted all along.

Souped Up

Tracking watery footprints all through the kitchen, there was no use pretending to be tidy. Saturated socks dripped with every step, more absorbent than the sponge idle in the sink. Washing away drought warnings, the rainy season has come to drown the bay area once again. Punishing storms drop gallons of water in an instant, drenching everything unfortunate enough to be outside at that inopportune moment. Of course, this is inevitably the time I would chose to venture out, certain that only light drizzle would fill the skies. Wrong, wrong again.

Cold, wet, clammy, and seeking comfort, I won’t even bother removing my jacket before banging a stock pot onto the stove. Soup is the only thing that can make the situation better; the simpler, the better. French onion is at the top of the list, rich and soothing, without any challenging preparation to contend with on a day that’s already difficult to endure.

In an Ayurvedic twist inspired by sweet golden milk, Golden Onion Soup glows with gilded turmeric and ginger-laced broth. Creamy coconut milk swirls throughout, lending body to this soulful bowlful, ensuring a satisfying experience down to the last spoonful.

So bring on the rain, I say! With a bare handful of pantry staples and a bit of restorative time in the kitchen, we can weather this storm. Just make sure you have an extra pair of dry socks at the ready.

Yield: Makes 6 - 8 Servings

Golden Onion Soup

Golden Onion Soup

In an Ayurvedic twist inspired by sweet golden milk, Golden Onion Soup glows with gilded turmeric and ginger-laced broth. Creamy coconut milk swirls throughout, lending body to this soulful bowlful, ensuring a satisfying experience down to the last spoonful.

Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1/4 Cup Vegan Butter or Coconut Oil
  • 4 Sweet Vidalia Onions, Quartered and Thinly Sliced
  • 2 Cloves Garlic, Minced
  • 1/2 Inch Fresh Ginger, Peeled and Minced
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Salt
  • 2 Tablespoons Garbanzo Bean Flour
  • 1 Teaspoon Ground Turmeric
  • 1/2 Cup Full-Fat Coconut Milk
  • 2 Tablespoons White Miso Paste
  • 4 – 5 Cups Vegetable Stock
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Ground Black Pepper
  • 1/4 Teaspoon Cayenne Pepper

Instructions

  1. In a large stock pot, melt the butter or coconut oil over medium heat. Add the onions and cook, stirring frequently, over medium heat for about 30 minutes. The onions should be lightly caramelized and highly aromatic.
  2. Add the garlic, ginger, and salt, sauteing for 30 minutes more, stirring every 5 minutes. The mixture should be very soft and amber brown.
  3. Add the garbanzo bean flour and turmeric, stirring to incorporate. Saute for just 2 – 3 minutes to lightly toast the flour before deglazing with the coconut milk.
  4. Whisk the miso paste into 4 cups of stock, until fully dissolved, before adding the liquid in as well. Bring the soup to a simmer, reduce the heat to medium low, and simmer gently for 15 – 20 minutes.
  5. Season with black and cayenne pepper and add more stock, if needed, to reach your desired thickness.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

8

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 197 Total Fat: 11g Saturated Fat: 8g Trans Fat: 0g Unsaturated Fat: 2g Cholesterol: 15mg Sodium: 2020mg Carbohydrates: 21g Fiber: 2g Sugar: 12g Protein: 4g

Lazy Days

Writing a cookbook all about 10-minute recipes has made me the laziest cook ever. I’ve often said that it’s spoiled me for regular dinnertime prep, reducing me to infantile tantrums if anything should threaten to spill over that arbitrary time limit. Though I’m ashamed to admit it, I’ve been known to throw down a spatula mid-stir and plunder the cupboard for a bowlful of cereal instead, too hungry or impatient to complete the absurdly simple task. Just like the increasing efficiency of technology has eradicated our tolerance for lag, knowing just how quick a meal can come together creates a terrible intolerance for long, drawn out steps towards food fabrication.

For anyone else who knows that struggle, I’d like to introduce your to my easiest, fastest recipe yet, possible to slap on the table in 3 minutes all told. No arduous chopping, sauteing, baking, grilling, poaching, or advanced techniques required. If you can open a can and operate a microwave, you can feed yourself very well indeed. Truly, it’s so simple that it’s barely even a recipe, to the point that I hesitate to share this quick fix as a formal preparation. Considering how many times it’s saved me from the daily dinner dilemma, however, it seemed like a worthwhile idea to share.

Beans. Salsa. Spices. Heat and eat. It’s not fancy fare, but it’s a healthy bowl-in-one and deeply satisfying. Even a bare-bones sort of pantry should be able to accommodate without advanced planning, especially when you look at the ingredients with a flexible perspective. Simple as it is, the beauty of this basic formula is that it’s infinitely adaptable to any type of beans or seasoning you can scrounge up. See the end notes for more inspiration, but don’t be afraid to depart from the beaten path; make it your own and embark on a new flavor adventure.

Yield: Makes 3 - 4 Servings

Instant Fiesta Soup

Instant Fiesta Soup

If you can open a can and operate a microwave, you can feed yourself very well indeed. The beauty of this basic formula is that it’s infinitely adaptable to any type of beans or seasoning you can scrounge up. See the end notes for more inspiration, but don’t be afraid to depart from the beaten path; make it your own and embark on a new flavor adventure.

Prep Time 1 minute
Cook Time 4 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes

Ingredients

Instant Fiesta Soup

  • 2 (15-Ounce) Cans No Salt Added Pinto Beans (Undrained)
  • 1 1/2 Cups Salsa
  • 1 1/2 Teaspoons Smoked Paprika
  • 1 Teaspoon Ground Cumin

For Topping (Optional):

  • Diced Avocado
  • Thinly Sliced Chives or Scallions

Instructions

  1. Toss the beans, aquafaba and all, into your blender along with the salsa and spices. Blend until mostly smooth but with a bit of texture still remaining, as desired.
  2. Transfer the mixture to a medium saucepan and heat over medium-high, until steaming hot all the way through; about 4 – 5 minutes. Alternatively, a single serving into the microwave for 2 minutes and store the rest in the fridge, sealed in an airtight container, for up to a week.
  3. Ladle into bowls and top each with avocado and chives or scallions. Dig in!

Notes

Variations:

  • On less lazy days, cook your own beans from scratch! Simply use about 3 cups total and either 1/2 – 1 cup of the aquafaba or vegetable broth, to reach your desired consistency.
  • To simply switch things up a bit, consider using black beans instead of pinto.
  • Make it an Italian-inspired soup by using white beans and marinara sauce in place of the salsa, plus a generous handful of fresh or dried herbs (heavy on the basil and parsley, please!)

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

4

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 152 Total Fat: 6g Saturated Fat: 1g Trans Fat: 0g Unsaturated Fat: 4g Cholesterol: 0mg Sodium: 697mg Carbohydrates: 22g Fiber: 8g Sugar: 4g Protein: 6g

Don’t Chicken Out

Back in the day, creamy chicken ramen was my jam. I grew up downing bowls of the stuff when I was too picky to accept the mere suggestion of a green vegetable on my plate. Heck, I even lost my first tooth while hastily slurping down those long strands of salty noodles! Now I realize that this style has a lot in common with tori paitan ramen, which has very rich and creamy broth, usually created from long-simmered chicken bones. Lowbrow instant noodles can’t compare to the depth and delicacy of the real thing, but poultry needn’t apply to forge an authentic flavor in a fraction of the time.

Be it mental malaise or a physical flu, this is the kind of soup that will cure what ails you, or at least provide a serious serving of comfort through it all. Such simple flavors are universally appealing; it’s the ramen that could very well unite a nation. The two keys to success are high quality stock options and superlative noodles, since there’s no where to hide these key players with such few ingredients in the mix. In a perfect world, you could make your own vegetable stock and reduce it down to a concentrate to replace the 1/2 cup of water, and go through the full process of making alkaline noodles from scratch… But for a quick fix, you really can’t beat this kind of instant ramen gratification.

Vegan Paitan Ramen

3 Ounces Dry Ramen Noodles (Straight or Curly)
1/2 Cup Unsweetened Non-Dairy Milk
1/2 Cup Water
2 Teaspoons Tapioca Starch
1 Teaspoon No-Chicken Broth Powder or Paste
1 Teaspoon Soy Sauce
1/2 Tablespoon Vegan Butter
Thinly Sliced Scallions (Optional)

Begin by setting a small pot of water on the stove to boil and cook your noodles to al dente, as directed by the instructions on the package. Drain thoroughly when ready.

Meanwhile, whisk together the non-dairy milk, water, starch, instant broth, and soy sauce, beating the mixture vigorous to ensure that there are no clumps of starch remaining. Pour everything into a small saucepan and place on the stove over medium-low, stirring frequently. Cook until thickened and bubbles break with regularity on the surface; about 5 minutes. Turn off the heat, add in the vegan butter, and stir until melted and smoothly incorporated.

Toss the noodles in the sauce, transfer to a bowl, and top with scallions if desired. Slurp away without delay! This dish does not keep well nor get better with age.

Makes 1 Serving

Printable Recipe

Weather or Not

Mentally battered by an assault of inclement weather warnings, you’d think the general public would have staged a revolt against all forecasters at this point. The anxiety and stress piles up faster than the foretold falling flakes, thanks to the added hype that always comes with incessant social media repetition. Nine times out of ten, expectations don’t match the reality of the climate outside, but the hysteria is sure real. So much as suggest that there might be anything less than blue skies and people will turn out from all corners of the earth to wrestle that last roll of toilet paper out of your hands at the grocery store. It’s like a battle of life and death, to secure a stockpile before the world ends, regardless of the pitifully low probability of even flurries.

This is a phenomenon I’ve become somewhat immune to in the generally mild atmosphere of the bay area, but that same illogical impulse still grips me when I’m least expecting it. Rain is the new snow around here, since it appears so rarely and thus cripples unsteady drivers and fragile public transit systems that don’t know how to cope. I still feel the pain of all those back east, hunkering down for a brutal nor’easter right now, undoubtedly hurtling through their local markets as if their shopping carts were assault weapons.

As darkening skies approach, what’s going into your basket? What are the staples that immediately make the cut as sustenance to hold you through those difficult times (maybe even hours!) when the roads are too intimidating to traverse? Practicality is not my strong suit, and so the parade of groceries marching down the conveyor belt at checkout is typically laughable. Peanut butter, bread, frozen peas; sure, those are wise investments. But the random assortment of chocolates, half-priced hummus, and impulse buy mini gnocchi? Those are perhaps a bit less crucial for long-term survival. I would not fare well if ever faced with a real lock-down emergency.

Luckily, my unreasonable yet well-meaning instincts have led me to create some incredible combinations out of those curiously assembled ingredients. Those mini gnocchi, for example, caught my eye as ideal comfort food when the going got rough, and they didn’t disappoint even when the forecast did. There’s never been a better time to indulge in such a recipe, although I can’t say that there would ever come a bad time, either.

Lavished with a buttery cream sauce made of typical pantry staples, it could very well be the new face of emergency rations, despite its less urgent origins. Dauphinoise potatoes typically layers thinly sliced spuds in a casserole concoction, but since pasta keeps longer and is almost always on hand, gnocchi struck me as a natural extension of the concept. In more dire times, or healthier mindsets, I realized that swapping out the dumplings for simple legumes like chickpeas could make for an equally satisfying, comforting side dish, too. It’s all the same starchy, savory, subtly salty flavors which meld into an effortless indulgence in the end.

If you haven’t already gone through the throes of panic-induced grocery shopping, may I make three quick suggestions? 1) Make a list. 2) Avoid the candy aisle. 3) Write in mini gnocchi as a necessity, no matter how silly it may appear at first glance. You’ll thank me for this later.

Gnocchi Dauphinoise

1 Pound Mini Potato Gnocchi
1/3 Cup Raw Cashews
1 Cup Unsweetened Non-Dairy Milk
1/3 Cup Vegetable Stock
2 Tablespoons Vegan Butter
1 Tablespoon Nutritional Yeast
2 Cloves Garlic, Minced
1/2 Teaspoon Dried Thyme
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
1/4 Teaspoon Ground White Pepper

Preheat your oven to 300 degrees.

Gently separate the mini gnocchi and toss them into a 1 1/2 quart baking dish. They’re so small that they don’t need to be parboiled before baking.

Toss all of the remaining ingredients into a high-speed blender and pulverize on the highest setting until perfectly silky smooth. If you’re using a machine that has a bit less torque, soak the cashews for at least 4 hours in advance before blender, to make them a bit softer and easier to emulsify. Blend for a full 6 – 8 minutes, until the mixture is steaming hot.

Pour the cashew cream all over the waiting gnocchi before easing the dish into the oven. Bake for 1 – 1 1/2 hours, until the gnocchi are fork-tender and the liquid is thick and rich. Top with freshly chopped parsley, if desired, and serve bubbling hot.

Makes 4 – 6 Servings as a Side; 2 – 3 Servings as an Entree with Salad

Printable Recipe