[Not Quite] Silent Sunday: Dal-icious

Dal Puri Roti with Tamarind Sauce

By Chef Philip Gelb of Sound & Savor

“I do not exaggerate when  I say this is one of my favorite breads in the world! It’s obviously of Indian origin, but this version is a Trinidad specialty. It works well on it’s own, but if you roll it out thin enough you can then stuff it with various curries and roll it up like a burrito for some Trini heaven.

Culantro is a related to cilantro and similar, yet different enough to seek out. If you have Latin markets in your area, you may be able to find it. It’s also called chado beni in Trinidad.

A tawa is a cast-iron or stainless steel griddle that fits on top of your stove burner (gas or electric.) These are inexpensive, usually made in India, and easily found at Indian or Caribbean markets or online.”

Tamarind Sauce:

1 Tablespoon Coconut Oil
4 Green Onions, Diced
2 Cloves Garlic, Minced
2 Tablespoons Fresh Cilantro
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
1/2 Teaspoon African Bird Pepper or Cayenne Pepper
1/4 Cup Palm Sugar
1 Cup Water
1/3 Cup Tamarind Concentrate

In a skillet, add the coconut oil, green onion, and garlic. Sauté for three minutes, until aromatic. Transfer to a mortar and pestle and pulverize along with the cilantro. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix well. Taste and adjust seasonings as desired.

Dal Puri Roti

Filling:

1 14-Ounce Cans Garbanzo Beans
1 Habanero Pepper, Seeded and Minced
3 Cloves Garlic, Minced
1 Teaspoon Salt
1 Teaspoon Ground Cumin
1 Bunch Fresh Cilantro
1 Bunch Fresh Culantro

Roti:

3 Cups All-Purpose Flour
2 Teaspoons Baking Powder
1/2 Teaspoon Active Dry Yeast
1 Teaspoon Salt
About 1 1/2 Cups Water­­­
Coconut Oil, to Cook

Place all of the ingredients for the filling into a food processor and grind into a rough mash. Set aside.

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, yeast, and salt. Add water and mix together with a spoon until the dough becomes too thick to stir. Use your hands to finish combining the ingredients. Use just enough water to form a ball and knead gently for a few minutes, until smooth. Cover dough with a clean kitchen towel and let rest for at least 1 hour.

Divide the dough into 10 equal pieces. Form each piece into a ball and then roll into a small circle. Add about 1/10th of the garbanzo mixture and wrap the dough around it, much like you would for a dumpling. Pinch the dough closed, cover once more, and let rest for another hour.

Place a griddle or large skillet over medium heat and brush liberally with coconut oil. Roll each ball into a flat, thin circle. Place the dough on the skillet and brush the top with more coconut oil. Cook for 1 minute before flipping. Cook for another minute, flip again, and cook for 1 minute longer. Repeat with all the remaining dough.

Makes 10 Dal Puri Roti

Printable Recipe

Advertisements

Speak Now or Forever Hold Your Peas

Some may find it crude. Some may be downright offended. I’ve simply decided to fully embrace all the pea-ness that this fleeting spring harvest has to offer. Really, there’s no way of going back at this point. I’ve already pea’d on my pizza. I even pea’d on my toast– At work, no less! Dining alfreso has been a true joy as the weather continues to improve, allowing me to pea outside with Luka, too. It’s safe to say that I’m going to keep on pea-ing everywhere until this stream of inspiration runs dry.

Did you really think I could resist sharing another pea-s of my mind before the short growing season passed us by? Girl, peas.

Hungry but tired after a full day of work, I seriously had to pea by the time dinner rolled around. Riffling through the fridge and pantry yielded a few delectable treasures to create an instant, effortless peas de résistance. Spinach and ricotta ravioli, quickly sauteed in garlic and butter, needs no further culinary intervention to shine, but a light sprinkle of coarse black pepper and crunchy veggie bacon certainly didn’t hurt.

Still, for all that fancy frippery, the real focal point of this meal was still those glorious green orbs; the overall combination easily a-peas’d my appetite.

Yes, Peas

“Congratulations San Francisco, you’ve ruined pizza!”

Harsh words for an innocent little slice. The catalyst for this outburst was a pie topped with verdant green broccoli florets. A perfectly reasonable addition, in my opinion, but far from the kid-approved standard menu that one might expect. If you too find unconventional vegetables adorning the typical thin-crust construction wholly offensive, I’d suggest you shield your eyes. Click away, don’t scroll any further, and let’s pretend like this never happened.

Are you still with me? Good! I knew we were friends for a reason.

Pea-zza, a springy seasonal variant on the classic, is lavished with tender sweet peas, of course, as well as crisp raw snap peas. Delicately nuanced and herbaceous cashew spread joins the party, rather than a gooey mozzarella that might otherwise smother such subtle flavors. If we’re going to put peas on pizza, we might as well change the whole game, right? Elevated to the status of gourmet fare with that simple substitution, you could easily serve this to the most discerning gourmet without batting an eyelash.

That’s not the final twist, though. Creamy coconut yogurt, flecked with lemon zest, lends brightness, lightening the whole affair in ways that defy its underlying richness. All yogurt is not created equal, and I have to admit, the stuff that Cultured Kitchen makes was largely the inspiration for this whole culinary experiment. Thicker than sour cream, completely unsweetened, just a tiny dab will satisfy. I found myself using it more like a whipped topping to accompany fresh berries than anything else.

It tortures me that it has such a limited release! There’s not even information about it online, and it’s unlikely I’ll encounter such a treat in regular grocery stores. If you’re in the same boat, all is not lost. In the case of this fresh flatbread, simply opt for a non-dairy yogurt without any added sugar or flavor, and omit the lemon juice, doubling down on the zest instead to prevent the drizzle from becoming too watery.

Please, give peas a chance. If it helps you wrap your mind around this crazy combination, think of it more as a seasonal flatbread, piled high with the best that nature has to offer. Your average onions, mushrooms, and olives can wait; this limited edition novelty is one to savor right away, while those lush green peas are still perfectly plump.

Pea-zza

1 Pound Prepared Pizza Dough
All-Purpose Flour
1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
3 Tablespoons Minced Garlic
1/4 Cup Nutritional Yeast (Optional)

1/2 Cup Cultured Kitchen Herbs & Chives Cashew Reserve
1 Cup Fresh Peas, Blanched or Frozen Peas, Thawed
1/2 Cup Sugar Snap Peas, Sliced into 1/2-Inch Lengths
2 Tablespoons Toasted Pistachios
2 Scallions, Thinly Sliced
Flaky Sea Salt
Ground Black Pepper

Lemon Yogurt Drizzle:

1/3 Cup Cultured Kitchen Live Coconut Yogurt (Unsweetened)
1 – 2 Tablespoons Lemon Juice
1 Teaspoon Lemon Zest

Preheat your oven to 500 degrees and lightly grease a large baking sheet or pizza stone.

Press the pizza dough out roughly into a flat round, lightly dusting both sides with flour. Pull and toss by hand or use a rolling pin to stretch it out to approximately 10 inches in diameter. Brush the entire surface with olive oil and sprinkle evenly with the garlic and nutritional yeast, if desired.

Bake for 5 to 7 minutes, until dough is thoroughly browned all over.

While it’s in the oven, prepare the yogurt drizzle by simply mixing up all the ingredients in a bowl. Set aside for the moment.

When you crust is hot and ready, slather it generously with the cashew spread and top with the peas, snap peas, pistachios, and scallions. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Drizzle with the yogurt sauce, slice, and serve immediately.

Makes 1 pizza; 3 – 4 Servings

Printable Recipe

I Like Ike’s

It’s not fine cuisine, but then, when can you ever say as much about the humble sandwich? Even at its most ambitious heights, fully stacked with the utmost care, it’s still a bread-bound vehicle for gooey, drippy, sloppy savories that otherwise defy handheld consumption. Sometimes it feels silly to order a sandwich when eating out, for the simplicity of this basic premise, but certain eateries do it right. Ike’s has been a bay area cult classic for many years, winning advocates of both carnivorous creations and meatless monsters. Offering a generous selection of vegan options, with endless opportunities for customization, it’s hard to resist the lure of this diverse selection when passing by one of the numerous outposts. Dozens, if not hundreds, of combinations are possible, even if not listed on local menus. After a few birthday freebies and random indulgences, I do have a few recommendations to make.

First of all, across the board, ALWAYS ask for dutch crunch bread. No excuses, no questions; Nothing else will suffice. Ask for pickles on the side to prevent a briny blowout. Specify “vegan” even when ordering something with “vegan” in the title, because not everyone gets the message behind the counter. Beyond that, as a general rule for life in general, add avocado whenever possible.

Sometimes I’m a Vegetarian: Grilled mushrooms, marinated artichoke hearts, pesto, and cheese.

Tom Brady: Avocado, cheddar, garlic and herb sauce, mushrooms, vegan breaded chicken.

Meatless Mike: Marinara, pepper jack, vegan meatballs.

XXX-Tina: Vegan breaded chicken, buffalo wing sauce, cheese.

Zenobia (SF Exclusive): Sriracha, hummus, cucumbers, tomatoes, vegan steak.

For a place where the stated goal is to “make sandwiches as unique as the individual ordering,” Ike’s stays true to that mission, from top to bottom bun.

No Bones About It

Iconic as it is deeply flawed, the imagery of a dog gnawing away at a huge, meaty bone is one embedded in our cultural fabric, a remnant of misguided early training practices. Our tiny beasts are carnivores at heart, some argue, irresistibly drawn to the taste of meat, who love nothing more than savoring our scraps while getting a good dental workout at the same time. Without picking apart the umpteen faults in that shaky logic, the irrefutable truth is that bones are dangerous for dogs big and small, young and old. Brittle and easily snapped into pointed shards, those sharp pieces can result in choking, digestive blockages, cuts around the gums and throat, vomiting, and in the worst cases, yes, those symptoms can be compounded, and that innocent treat can become fatal.

Vegan or not, bones have no place on the menu for humans, so why should they suffice for our canine companions? Countless alternatives exist for safer, softer options, including those made from scraps of a different sort. Polishing off a few yards of leftover remnant yarn, this quick knit bone was a satisfying project for both human and animal participants.

A prodigious chewer with especially pointed little teeth, I thought for sure my monster baby would tear right through my handiwork in less time than it took to complete, but I’m happily surprised by its longevity thus far. Content to teethe rather than shred, Luka seems to savor this new toy with a sense of appreciation. It’s only a matter of time before the plush facsimile lies in ruin, no doubt, but that can easily be replaced; the pup himself most certainly cannot.

Sending Home the Bacon

What do you get for the man who has everything? More importantly, what do you make for the man who isn’t particularly thrilled by birthday cake, lives on the opposite side of the country, and would never so much as drop a hint about any particular wants or needs? This is the conundrum I face every time my dad’s birthday rolls around. Proving that the ones who give the most are terrible at accepting the same kindness, he’s notoriously impossible to shop for, even when it comes to the most basic necessities. Appreciative of the gesture, he will always accept the typical gifts of shirts, books, and ties with grace, but really, you shouldn’t have. Really.

The only thing I know for sure is that my dad loves music, obscure movies, and ever-so-slightly burnt popcorn to enjoy with both. I have strong memories of working diligently upstairs in my room, only to smell the distinct aroma of toasted, vaguely blackened kernels wafting through the air, and I’d know it was time to take a break. That meant it was 9:00, our designated TV hour, which always came with a heaping handful of his homemade snack mix. Crowning this simple blend was a generous shake of bacon salt, the curiously vegetarian seasoning with a smoky, savory edge. It was a comforting routine, and one that I still miss almost three years since moving out.

If I can’t be there to share the flicks and snacks in person, then I had to find a way to send an edible understudy.

Vegans are making everything into bacon these days, from eggplant to coconut, but my unique blend goes back to a classic mixture of meaty tempeh and deeply umami mushrooms. It’s a simple yet remarkably satisfying seasoning that adds an extra punch to any dish, not just freshly popped corn. Think french fries, avocado toast, veggie burgers, roasted Brussels sprouts, corn on the cob, bar nuts, and so much more. It could quickly become the new savory staple that you suddenly can’t live without, even if you’ve never tasted the “real” thing.

Birthdays come and go, but the opportunity to treat loved ones to a special delicacy is fleeting. This successful, universally appealing formula may just be an ideal gift for equally discerning recipients in your life, too.

Bacon Salt

3 Tablespoons Soy Sauce
1 Tablespoon Liquid Smoke
1 Tablespoon Maple Syrup
1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
1 Tablespoon Nutritional Yeast
1/4 Teaspoon Smoked Paprika
1/8 Teaspoon Ground Black Pepper
1 8-Ounce Package Tempeh
1/2 Cup Sliced Cremini Mushrooms
1/4 Cup Dried, Sliced Shiitake Mushrooms
1/4 Cup Coarse Sea Salt

Preheat your oven to 300 degrees and set aside an 8 x 8-inch baking pan.

Stir together the soy sauce, liquid smoke, maple syrup, oil, nutritional yeast, paprika, and pepper in a large mixing bowl. Crumble the tempeh as finely as possible and toss it in, along with the mushrooms. Mix thoroughly, coating the pieces.

Pour everything, including the excess marinade into your waiting pan. Bake for 2 1/2 – 3 hours, stirring every 15 – 25 minutes or so to keep the entire batch cooking evenly and preventing it from burning. The edges can go from soft to scorched surprisingly quickly, so standby and keep a close eye on it the entire time it’s in the oven.

Cook until brown all over, dry to the touch, and highly aromatic. Be aware that your kitchen may smell like bacon for the rest of the day, but I would hardly consider that a problem.

Let cool completely before transferring to your blender or food processor along with the salt. Pulse until the pieces are completely broken down. Strain through a fine mesh sieve if you would like a particularly even grind and re-blend any remaining large pieces. Store at room temperature in an airtight container.

Makes About 1 Cup

Printable Recipe