BitterSweet

Sweet Musings with a Bitterly Sharp Wit


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On An Upward Spiral

Well beyond the realm of raw noodles, the simple spiralizer is capable of greater culinary feats than most might realize. Truth be told, until just a few months ago, I had never ventured beyond the original “spaghetti” blade, blissfully spinning in circles without knowing that a whole new world of textures and flavors lay just within reach. As if making up for lost time, I’ve been churning out different coiled vegetable creations one after another, fueled by a hunger for experimentation.

These latest recipes can all be found on Mealthy.com, a brand new community for cooks passionate about making healthy meals. I’m excited to lend my voice to this fresh collection of recipes that run the gamut from everyday dinners to fancy holiday feasts, bringing together talented contributors from all across the globe. There’s a dedicated vegan category that you’ll definitely want to bookmark for more inspiration, but of course I do have a few favorites. Since I’ve been on a roll with my spiralizer lately, I’ve clearly had a circular focus…



Spiralized Vegan Sushi Bowls

Get all the satisfying flavors of sushi in a lighter, effortless package. Swap spiralized daikon radish for starchy rice and skip the fussy rolling by piling the good stuff into a bowl. Sushi night will never be the same again.



Vegan Tuna Noodle Casserole

Surprise! This tuna noodle casserole features neither tuna fish, nor noodles! Fake out your friends with this unbelievably convincing vegan version of the classic casserole. Jackfruit works with wakame to create a fishy taste and texture, while ribbons of potatoes stand in for the traditional egg noodles. After one bite, even avowed purists may just find that they prefer this modern reinterpretation.



Quick Pickle Curlicues

Instead of a fully fermented pickle, get tangy cucumber strings cured in under an hour! Long curlicues make these perfect for serving over hot dogs or stretched along the side of a plate.



Spiralized Zucchini Frittata

Try this eggless and fresh summery frittata that’s protein-packed with garbanzo bean flour which takes charge here. Add an abundance of zucchini spirals and bake this eggless party into a tender, savory cake. Though you could easily serve it unadorned, the tomato relish truly takes it over the top. Seek only peak produce to make this combination truly sing.



Sweet Potato Praram

Just about anything would be delicious when smothered in a spicy peanut sauce, but this bold blend is particularly invigorating. Sweet potatoes take the place of starchy rice noodles in this completely plant-based entrée, complete with protein-packed tofu for a fully balanced meal in one bowl.



Borscht Ribbon Salad

When it’s too hot to contemplate soup, keep your cool by using your spiralizer to deliver this simple salad recipe. Inspired by borscht, this earthy blend is crisp, tangy, and highly satisfying, no matter the temperature outside.



Spiralized Baked Hash Browns

Crispy, golden hash browns are always irresistible, but difficult to get right when serving a crowd. Make easy work of the task by spiralizing instead of shredding your spuds, and bake the resulting strands in the oven to get the perfect results every time.



Spiralized Root Revelry Salad with Fennel-Herb Vinaigrette

What grows together, goes together, as this earthy salad so tastefully proves. Colorful root vegetables intertwine with sweet-tart dried cranberries and are brightened with the bold acidity of fennel vinaigrette.

I have much more to share that will whirl you right off your feet, so stay tuned for even more spiralized inspiration!

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Bowl-ed and Beautiful

A hoarder by trade but a minimalist at heart, bridging the gap between these disparate impulses can be a herculean task. Dishware stacks up in towering piles on every shelf of my small living space, populating the cabinets and drawers, overflowing into the outdoor shed, and still it’s a strain to find homes for every odd garnish. A riotous collection of colors and shapes, few pieces match a full set, but each one can command equal attention in the right scene. Such is the struggle of the average food photographer, forever adding to the archive of possible plating options. Particularly unusual or unique finds hold particular allure, but truth be told, it’s inevitably the simplest options that get the most play.

Everything looks good on white, setting off any food in sharp contrast like a bright spotlight, allowing the recipe itself to shine. Clean lines draw the eye smoothly around the composition overall, comfortably guiding a visual path back to the “hero” of the moment. Bowls like these are invaluable because no matter the theme or concept for any given assignment, these supporting actors always play a crucial role, without breaking a sweat.

Quality whites are essential even if you aren’t building a feast fit to photograph. The gentle plunging rims of these cereal bowls are an ideal example of form meeting function. When Sweese approached me with the opportunity to share this set, I couldn’t believe my (and hopefully your) luck. I’ve found myself using them for daily meals as well as more fanciful composed photo shoots. Win your very own set of four 28-ounce porcelain bowls by leaving me a comment about what you would serve in them first! Log your submission by following this link to the official contest page and find more ways to enter while you’re there. You have until July 25th to throw your hat into the ring; don’t miss this chance to make a bowl-ed statement!

Winning may not help control the overzealous prop shopper, but at least your place settings can look perfectly orderly and uncluttered.


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Background Information

Every single photo, be it simple or complex, novice or professional, must always start with two essential components: A subject and a background. Whether we’re talking about people, products, or skyscrapers, it’s the same story. Mercifully, greater control is bestowed upon the photographer lucky enough to work with food, effortlessly modifying textures, colors, and patterns to best highlight the dish du jour. Inevitably cast as the backup singer by definition, photographic backgrounds never get the praise they deserve for setting the scene. Few single components can lay claim to the same power when it comes to affecting the whole composition of a piece in one fell swoop. Such responsibility naturally comes with serious drawbacks, especially when you find your microscopic apartment studio bursting at the seams with huge wooden boards and slabs of worn ceramic tiles. Lest every image start looking the same, it becomes imperative to start diversifying your options, and fast.

Uber Gray Grunge From Ink and Elm Backdrops

For a number of years, I found moderate success using lengths of contact paper as one approach to expand my collection of backgrounds, but this approach has distinct limitations. Rarely do the most useful patterns come in a matte finish, leading to distracting reflections or harsh shiny spots under the glare of strobe lights, especially if there should ever be the smallest wrinkle in the roll.

It was a serendipitous moment of aimless online shopping when I stumbled across Ink and Elm Backdrops. Though clearly developed with the portrait photographer in mind, I immediately saw potential for my inanimate focal points, too. Made of high-quality vinyl, the big question would be how that texture would translate under the close scrutiny of a macro lens. Don’t expect deep wood grain or genuine stone surfaces, but happily, not a single image came out screaming “ARTIFICIAL PRINT BACK HERE! THIS IS ALL A FARCE!” Good news too, since I hate it when my props yell at me.

Heirloom Planks From Ink and Elm Backdrops

Best of all for food photography, these surfaces are highly washable. Go ahead, lay your greasiest potato chips right on top, splash around with cookies dunked in milk; nothing seems to shake these sturdy foundations.

Flexible sizing is another big benefit that traditional alternatives can’t boast. Small squares are available for your basic shoot, but if you want to create a whole Thanksgiving spread on a rustic oak table spanning a couple of feet in both directions, they’ve got you covered, too. Plus, each sheet easily rolls up for compact storage when it’s all said and done.

There is one very serious pitfall to ordering through Ink and Elm, however. Their expansive catalog is so extensive, it’s almost impossible to pick out just one or two patterns!