An Obsession with All Things Handmade and Home-Cooked



Who had the baffling idea to name the annual German beer and food extravaganza “Oktoberfest” when the majority of the celebration takes place in September? Perhaps it was a subtle method of throwing outsiders off the trail of free-flowing booze, because it certainly does succeed in disorienting me every year. No matter how carefully I plan, I can never seem to hit this moving target with an appropriately timed blog post- Despite the fact that it’s actually standing still. Maybe that clouded vision is just all the alcohol talking.

On this, the last day of the month, I’m here to say that at last, victory is mine! Best of all, the festivities are officially sanctioned to drag on for at least another week, so you have plenty of time to get into the kitchen and whip this one up. You’ll want to revisit the recipe well beyond the scope of drunken revelries though, so make sure you keep it on file well beyond these ambiguous dates.

Dreaming of all the most comforting foods to help soak up a pint or two and inspired by the German theme, potatoes were an obvious base for a suitably hearty accompaniment. Tender potatoes are served warm, tossed with meaty “sausage” crumbles simmered in a bit of the golden elixir itself, contrasted by the crisp bite of tart green apple and the satisfyingly sour foil of fresh sauerkraut. A far cry from your Aunt Betty’s mayonnaise-soaked picnic fare, I hesitate to ascribe it the title of “potato salad,” because this autumnal melange is truly a different beast altogether. Celebrate the humble spud, don’t hide it in that gelatinous white goop! A simple mustard vinaigrette brings everything together, without weighing the dish down.

Teetotalers are welcome to replace the beer with vegetable broth, to no ill effects. Even if you can’t ever place Oktoberfest in the correct month like me, you can still celebrate Oktuberfest any time of year.

Oktuberfest Warm Potato Salad

1 Pound Yukon Gold Potatoes, Diced
1 Pound Baby Red-Skinned Potatoes, Halved
1/2 Large Sweet Onion, Quartered and Thinly Sliced
2 Cups Vegan Sausage Crumbles
1/2 Cup Sauerkraut, Thoroughly Drained
3/4 – 1 1/4 Cup Beer
1 Tart Green Apple, Cored, Quartered, and Sliced
1 Tablespoon Whole Grain Mustard
1 Tablespoon Red Wine Vinegar
1/4 Cup Olive Oil, to Taste
Salt and Pepper

Bring a large pot of water to a boil before adding in the potatoes. Simmer gently to prevent them from breaking up, and cook until fork tender; about 10 minutes. Thoroughly drain but do not rinse.

Meanwhile, in a medium skillet, combine the sliced onion with the “sausage” crumbles, drained sauerkraut, and 3/4 cup of the beer. Simmer until the beer has been almost entirely absorbed, the onions are tender, and sausage crumbles are warmed through. Add more beer as needed if it cooks down too quickly, to prevent anything from sticking to the bottom of the pan and burning.

Toss the sliced apple into a large bowl with the cooked potatoes and sausage crumble mixture. Separately, whisk together the mustard, vinegar, and oil before pouring the dressing in as well. Stir thoroughly but gently so as not to mash the potato pieces. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.

The potatoes will continue to absorb the dressing as the salad sits, so don’t be afraid to add an extra tablespoon or two of beer into the mix if preparing it in advance.

Serve warm or at room temperature, with a frosty mug of beer on the side for maximum enjoyment.

Makes 6 – 8 Servings

Printable Recipe


All-Purpose Eats

Patience is not one of my strengths, as any members of my family could attest, and this painfully slow, barely visible advancement of spring is driving me mad. Bolting up and out of bed upon spying little green buds through my bedroom window, I race downstairs to assess the weather… Only to discover yet another clammy, grey morning laying in wait. Feeling thoroughly ambushed by this disappointment, it’s difficult to know how best to displace that negative emotion. Typically taking to the kitchen and channeling frustrations and joys alike into something edible, the lack of seasonal produce has made even that a daunting task at times. So, let’s talk about season-less food, because it’s not all frozen or found in an aluminum can.

One could argue that potatoes are best harvested in the cooler months, but unlike so much other produce, these tubers keep so well and for so long, that they’ve effectively lost their seasonality through modernization. Unless you’re growing your own spuds (and more power to you, in that case) anyone and everyone should have easy access to dozens of varieties, all year round. Having them at the average cook’s disposal for 365 days of the year has led them to morph and mutate into dishes appropriate for any occasion, hot and cold, rich and light- You name it, there’s a potato for that.

And so I land at the recipe, with what some might find a boring, nothing-special baked potato. However, I have yet to meet a single soul who could claim to dislike such a dish, so that sounds pretty darned special to me. The real take-away from this piece though are the tofu croutons. If nothing else, ‘taters or not, you’ve got to give those crispy, savory, and somewhat salty little toppers a go. Plus, if you happen to be lucky enough to enjoy a more cooperative spring, you could just as well pile them on top of fresh, seasonal salads. As for me… I’ll just keep enjoying those potatoes a bit longer.

Loaded Baked Potatoes with Tofu Croutons

Crispy Tofu Croutons:

2 Tablespoons Olive Oil
2 Tablespoons Soy Sauce
1 Tablespoon Rice Vinegar
1/4 Teaspoon Salt
Pinch Freshly Ground Black Pepper
1 14-Ounce Package Extra-Firm Tofu, Drained and Pressed for 30 Minutes

Baked Potatoes:

4 Medium Baking Potatoes, Such as Russet

1/4 Cup Olive Oil
1 – 3 Tablespoons Unsweetened Soy Milk
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
Pinch Sweet Paprika
2 Scallions or a Handful of Fresh Chives, Thinly Sliced
1 Cup Roughly Chopped Steamed Broccoli
1/2 Cup Roughly Chopped Roasted Peppers
Vegan Cheddar “Cheese” (Optional)
Avocado, Diced (Optional)

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees, and line a baking sheet with aluminum foil.

In a resealable plastic container, combine the oil, soy sauce, vinegar, salt, and pepper, and stir well.

Cut your tofu into very small cubes, about 1 cm each, keeping them as uniform as possible to ensure even baking. Place them in the container with the marinade, seal the container, and shake gently to coat the cubes in the mixture. Let rest until the oven comes up to temperature.

Transfer the tofu cubes and excess marinade to your prepared baking sheet, and spread them out into one even layer. Bake for 60 – 75 minutes, stirring every 20 minutes or so, until evenly browned.

Meanwhile, prepare your potatoes by washing them and cutting a slit into the top of each, to vent the steam. Place them in the oven alongside your tofu, and check for doneness at about 60 minutes. The skins will be slightly crispy, and they should be fork tender on the inside.

Let the potatoes cool for at least 10 minutes, and then scoop out the insides, leaving a thin layer of potato around the skins so they don’t collapse. Place them in a medium bowl, along with the olive oil, 1 tablespoon of soy milk, the salt, and paprika. Use a potato masher or fork to break up the potato and incorporate the other ingredient. Don’t overdo it, a little bit of chunkiness is perfect! If necessary, add more soymilk until it reaches your desired texture, and then add in the scallions, broccoli, and roasted peppers. Mix well to combine. Spoon the mashed potatoes back into the skins, and top with the tofu croutons. Finish off with a sprinkle of vegan “cheese” and/or diced avocado, if desired.

Serves 4

Printable Recipe

Recipe originally written for Nasoya tofu