An Obsession with All Things Handmade and Home-Cooked


Oregon’s Got Talent

Nestled into the mountainous terrain of southern Oregon resides a town often praised for its close proximity to other cities. Ashland, home of quite possibly the longest running and most prolific Shakespeare festival in the US, is a mere ten-minute drive away, and Medford, large enough to support its very own Airport, is another bustling metropolis within easy reach. Talent, Oregon may not have one particular claim to fame nor pop up on most travel guides of the Pacific North West, but after spending a few days in the 1.33 square miles that over 6,000 residents call home, it seems a shame to overlook this hidden gem.

If for nothing else, it’s worth stopping in for some rest and relaxation on Shady Grove Farm. Established by Husband and Wife Lynn and Lin, it’s a sanctuary for animals and humans alike. Make no mistake, it’s not just a place to stay, but a full vacation in and of itself. Stay in one of the many rooms available, from a studio with a complete kitchen, to a cozy tent by the fire for “glamping,” and you’ll immediately realize that you’re truly a guest in the Bernhardts’ home.

Tempting as it may be to sleep in every morning, the promise of Lin’s breakfast is a good reason to greet the day. As a vegan and talented cook, I’ve never eaten so well or so richly for the first meal of the day; tofu scramble enchiladas, smothered in a mild green hatch chile sauce. Cooking intuitively, when plied for a recipe, she offered that the real secret to success for this dish was a light veneer of Vegenaise lavished across the tortillas, providing moisture and flavor in one fell swipe.

Even when I professed my love for plain old oatmeal, Lin managed to create a bowlful fit for a king. Lavished with fresh strawberries and complimented by brown sugar, peach chutney, and sweet oat milk, each of the homemade condiments elevated the steel-cut grains to a new level. After that experience, it would be impossible to go back to instant.

If you’re really lucky, before you go off gallivanting around the farm to explore the organic garden or help feed the chickens, Lin just might gift you with a handful of her homemade chocolate chip cookies. No matter how stuffed you are after breakfast, when faced with these soft and chewy treats, it always seems perfectly reasonable to follow it up with a sweet morning snack.

Though it feels like an oasis in the countryside, you’re far from stranded when staying at the farm. Main Street is a short walk away, and while it may boast only a dozen businesses or so, there’s a surprising wealth of fine dining to be found. Even on Sunday evening when all other eateries were closed, The Grotto turned out to be a lucky find. Happy to accommodate hungry vegans, it was no problem to forgo the cheese on any of their myriad pizza offerings, and the promise of an unlimited salad bar is always music to my ears. Don’t overlook the beers and tap, either- A crisp glass of pear cider made this meal into something truly special.

If there’s only one opportunity to eat out, however, I would insist that you pay a visit to Harvest Restaurant. Don’t bother consulting the menu, but call ahead and alert the kitchen that you would like a vegan entree. State your budget, and be prepared for an unforgettable meal. Working with whatever fresh, local, and organic produce is on hand, the chef works magic to craft incredible meatless mains right on the spot. I was amazed at the tower of caramelized onion farro, grilled squash, beets, and chanterelle mushrooms, and crisp fried potatoes that greeted me at the table. Rather than finding dietary restrictions an imposition, the chef gamely takes on any requests, claiming that it’s like a real-life version of Iron Chef that he genuinely relishes. For dessert, sorbet was already on the menu, and the bright, honey-like cantaloupe flavor made for an idea finish to this impeccable dinner.

I had always seen myself more as a city gal, drawn to the daily hustle and bustle like a moth to the light, but this trip had me reconsidering that notion… This beautiful slice of country life seems like the perfect antidote to the common urban commotion.


All Carrots, No Sticks

My love for carrots has been well documented since birth. Although I have no recollection of the incident, I’ve been told many times over that in my earliest stages of infatuation with the orange root, I came down with a legitimate case of carotenemia. Against my typically paper-white skin, I can only imagine what a glowing, golden orb of a baby I must have been! Perhaps it’s for the best that there are no lasting memories (or photos) of this to haunt me.

Now well into my twenties, I’ve learned to rein in my carrot cravings, but they’re a constant staple in my life. A vegetable crisper without at least a pound of the crisp taproots is truly empty, as far as I’m concerned. Typically eaten without any ceremony, cooking, or even basic preparation, it’s still dangerously easy to take their unique flavor for granted.

Naturally sweet, pure carrot juice is a real treat on a hot summer’s day. Although we’ve technically arrived on autumn’s doorstep, the heat is still going strong, and it just might take more serious measures to keep cool. That’s where this impossibly, laughably simple granita comes in. Little more than pure pressed carrots and a pinch of fresh mint, even the sweetener could be considered optional, depending on the flavor and intensity of your juice.

While most people think of carrots as lowly vegetables, good for little more than filler on the dinner plate, I would implore you to open up your mind- and mouth- to greater carrot consideration. It’s remarkable what a little bit of time in the freezer can do to transfer this pure orange elixir into a bona fide dessert.

Carrot Granita

2 Cups 100% Carrot Juice
1/4 Cup Granulated Sugar or 3 Tablespoons Agave Nectar
1 Tablespoon Fresh Mint Leaves, Finely Minced

What follows is so simple that it can hardly even be considered a recipe. Simply combine all the ingredients and stir until your sweetener of choice has fully dissolved. Pour the mixture into 9 by 13-inch baking pan and place on stable, flat surface in the freezer. Allow it to rest for half an hour.

Use a dinner fork to scrape any ice crystals that have begun to form on the sides and bottom of the pan. Place the pan back in the freezer and repeat this procedure, scraping and mixing every 20 – 30 minutes for a total of 3 – 4 hours.

Once mixture is thoroughly frozen, you should end up with light, fluffy flakes that look like dry orange crystals. Scoop into glasses and enjoy right away.

Makes 4 – 6 Servings

Printable Recipe


We Be Jammin’

Summer, no matter how long, hot, or dry, never overstays its welcome in my home. The season always ends up feeling shorter than the rest, abruptly cut off by the rude interruption of an autumnal cold snap, or forced to jump into the conversation late thanks to a long-winded spring shower. Every moment of warmth in between is savored, if not greedily seized, because it’s just never enough to satiate my cravings. While June, July, and August fly by, I’ve been known to mow through more fully grown watermelons than seems humanly possible, trying in vain to quench a never-ending thirst for both the fruit and the season itself. Cleaning up the wreckage after yet another destructive melon binge, I started thinking about what was left once the juicy pink flesh had been devoured. Surely, there was something better to do with all of that perfectly good rind than lay it to waste in the trash.

Meanwhile, another sort of refuse was piling up in considerable tonnage; cucumber peels, in all their green glory, suddenly seemed too precious to take for granted, much like the fleeting days of summer. Both leftovers possessed a uniquely refreshing, watery constitution, and were neutral enough to bend in either a sweet or savory direction with equal success. Surely, the two could join forces and become something much greater than their individual parts.

Jam is the answer. Cucumber-melon jam, a piece of the season preserved for months to come, without detracting from the immediate gratification of the fresh produce itself. The key for success is to make sure that every last piece of green skin is peeled away from the watermelon rind, since it’s tough and somewhat bitter- The one leftover element that’s only worth saving for the compost heap. Simple and vibrant, the combination could also pair beautifully with a handful of fresh mint, or even basil for a more unconventional approach.

From trash to treasure, rinds and peels haven’t been given their fare share of the culinary spotlight, but I think it’s about time to change all that. One taste of this sweet, simple condiment, and you’ll never be able to justify throwing away the excavated shell of another watermelon ever again.

Cucumber-Melon Jam

1/3 Pound Cucumber Peels
1/2 Cup Water
2 Tablespoon Lemon Juice
4 Teaspoons Calcium Water*
1 1/2 Pounds Watermelon Rind, Peeled and Chopped
2 Cups Granulated Sugar
4 Teaspoons Pomona’s Universal Pectin Powder
1 1/2 Teaspoons Vanilla Paste or Extract

Before you begin, prepare the calcium water. To do so, combine 1/4 teaspoon calcium powder (the small packet included in the box of Pomona’s pectin) with 1/4 cup water in a small container with a lid. Shake well to dissolve. Leftover calcium water can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a year.

Place the cucumber peels, water, lemon juice, and calcium water in your blender and thoroughly puree. Once smooth, add in the prepared watermelon rind and blend on a moderate speed. Depending on your textural preferences, puree the mixture until completely smooth, or leave it slightly chunky. Both approaches are equally tasty!

Transfer the liquid base to a medium-sized saucepan and place over medium heat on the stove. In a separate bowl, mix together the sugar and pectin powder. Bring the liquids up to a boil before adding in the sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once it returns to a vigorous bubble, stir in the vanilla, remove from the heat and pour into 4 or 5 clean half-pint glass jars. Simply let cool and seal with an air-tight lid to make “freezer jam” which will keep in the fridge for about a month, or follow these suggestions to properly can the jam and put it up for about a year.

Makes 4 – 5 Cups

Printable Recipe


From Blog to Book

No longer is it a rare feat to see talented bloggers bridging the gap between online text and printed, published prose, but it still takes an incredible amount of determination to successfully make the leap. Considering the wealth of creativity that exists out there in the blogosphere, I can’t imagine a better place to start scouting new authors. Among all of those young hopefuls, Richa Hingle of Vegan Richa always struck me as particularly deserving, so much so that I recall pestering her many years ago about creating her own cookbook already! Pulling from a seemingly inexhaustible trove of inspiration, her recipes stood out as being both familiar, with delicious reference points that were easy to understand, while simultaneously forging a new culinary path. Buffalo Chickpea Pizza? Cauliflower Sandwich Bread? Why didn’t I think of that?

Now showcasing her unique flare for the Indian cooking that began her passion for food, Vegan Richa’s Indian Kitchen is a breath of fresh air on the crowded bookshelf of new cookbook releases. Humbly claiming to have no formal culinary training, this very approach is what makes Richa’s recipes so compelling. They don’t put an on airs or devolve into confusing procedures with unknown ingredients. While Indian food is still somewhat intimidating to the casual cook, Richa does wonders to demystify the complex flavors of myriad curries, easily guiding the willing reader to all new edible delights.

Kicking things off with a hearty breakfast offering, the Savory Oat Hash (Kanda Poha) on page 27 was just my speed. Oats always make an appearance at day break around here, regardless of seasons or holidays. There’s no reason why the whole grain staple needs to be plain and dull, though. Richa’s approach kicks up the classic to a whole new level; spicy, savory flavors reinvent the old fashioned oat. Textural issues can be one of the biggest pitfalls to preparing this temperamental grain, but none of that struggle was evident here. Comforting, easy to eat, but not the least bit mushy, it was an invigorating change of pace to the typical morning routine.

Seeking ways to use up a considerable stockpile of quinoa, the Potato Quinoa Patties (Aloo Tikki) on page 40 immediately leapt out as a “must make.” Employing red quinoa rather than white, the results were as visually impressive as they were crave-worthy. The spud-based batter was surprisingly easy to work with, holding together beautifully all through the process of pan frying and effortlessly developing a crisp, golden crust around the edges. An incredibly moist, tender interior lurked just beneath the surface, boasting a nuanced, harmonious blend of spices, much more complex than I would have managed solo with my default mix. Paired with a simple chickpea curry, I had myself a complete meal in no time at all. This recipe is a definite keeper, to be made again many times over.

Intrigued by the unconventional blend of curry and puff pastry, I simply couldn’t resist giving the Makhani Vegetable Pot Pie on page 132 a try. Though I feared that the filling appeared impossibly soupy at first, a terrible miscalculation of liquid additions, it thickened beautifully after cooling. For anyone with a more timid palate, or those still uneasy about exotic flavors, this should be the gateway to Indian cooking. Mild overall and subtly sweet, the melange of spices, rich coconut gravy, and fresh vegetables should make this an easy crowd-pleaser, no matter the audience. Plus, when using frozen puff pastry to crown the dish, you’d be hard-pressed to craft a quicker, more impressive meal.

Granted, perhaps you should take my words with a grain of salt, and a big pinch of cumin while you’re at it. Richa has been a dear blog buddy for longer than I can recall, and her cookbook was offered to me free of charge. Why should you take my words of praise at face value? Quite frankly, if you missed out on the opportunity to taste even a single dish from Richa’s Vegan Kitchen, you would be doing yourself, and your taste buds, a terrible disservice.


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