More ‘Taters, Less Haters

Potato salad, as a basic concept, brings to mind visions of buttery golden cubes of potatoes, drenched in a heavy white blanket of mayonnaise, with a few token flecks of celery and onion strewn about like stray confetti.

Turning that concept on its head, Chinese potato salad isn’t even cooked, let alone heavily dressed. Raw potatoes, shredded into fine floss, crisp as taut guitar strings, are lacquered with a simple, acidic, and often spicy vinaigrette.

The finest example of this rare specimen I found was in Honolulu, at Angelo Pietro where it’s their signature salad. It’s been a long time since I was lucky enough to visit the islands, and sadly, it will likely be a while before I can return. For now, recreating those cherished flavor memories is the next best thing to making that 2,397 mile journey.

Turns out the full recipe (all 5 ingredients of it) was published in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin 20 years ago! The secret is that the potato is cut with the sharp, peppery bite of daikon radish, and a touch of lettuce for a refreshing crunch. Even if you can’t pick up the official, branded dressing, that too is effortlessly replicated in your own home kitchen. For a lighter, brighter, refreshing take on potato salad, this is one you’ve got to try.

Yield: Makes 4 Servings

Raw Potato Salad

Raw Potato Salad

Crisp strands of spiralized potato and daikon radish intertwine in this light, bright, summery salad.

Prep Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes

Ingredients

Raw Potato Salad

  • 4 Large (1 1/2 - 2 Pounds) Russet Potatoes
  • 1 Medium (3/4 Pound) Daikon
  • 4 Leaves Iceberg or Romaine Lettuce, Shredded
  • 1/2 - 2/3 Cup Original Angelo Pietro Dressing (or Copycat Recipe as Follows)
  • Microgreens or Sprouts, such as Radish or Alfalfa, for Garnish

Angelo Pietro Dressing Copycat:

  • 1/4 Cup Rice Vinegar
  • 2 Tablespoons Tamari
  • 1/4 Large Yellow Onion
  • 1 Clove Garlic
  • 1 Tablespoon Black Olive Brine
  • 1 1/2 Teaspoons Dark Brown Sugar, Firmly Packed
  • 1 Teaspoon Nutritional Yeast
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Crushed Red Pepper Flakes
  • 1/4 Teaspoon Ground Black Pepper
  • 1/2 Cup Neutral Oil, such as Avocado, Rice Bran, or Grapeseed Oil

Instructions

    1. Peel the potatoes and daikon, cut off ends run them through a spiralizer. Immediately place the shreds in a bowl of ice water. Rinse until the water runs clear, to remove the starch while preventing oxidation that results in browning. Thoroughly drain and cut the strands in half so they aren't too long.
    2. To make the dressing, place all the ingredients in your blender and pulse to combine. With the motor running, slowly stream in the oil, until smooth and fully emulsified.
    3. Toss the daikon and potato with dressing to coat, to taste. When ready to serve, create a bed of shredded lettuce on a serving platter. Mound the dressed shreds on top, and finish with a sprinkle of sprouts. Enjoy ice-cold.

Notes

Dressing can be prepared in advance, if stored in an airtight container in the fridge, for up to three weeks.

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Nutrition Information:

Yield:

4

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 431Total Fat: 25gSaturated Fat: 6gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 46gCholesterol: 5mgSodium: 727mgCarbohydrates: 62gFiber: 15gSugar: 6gProtein: 12g

All nutritional information presented within this site are intended for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and any nutritional information on BitterSweetBlog.com should only be used as a general guideline. This information is provided as a courtesy and there is no guarantee that the information will be completely accurate. Even though I try to provide accurate nutritional information to the best of my ability, these figures should still be considered estimates.

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