BitterSweet

An Obsession with All Things Handmade and Home-Cooked


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Cheers to the New Year

Defined by drunken revelry and proverbial open bars of debauchery, it should come as no surprise that New Year’s Eve has never been greeted with much enthusiasm in the BitterSweet household. A whole family of teetotalers and working people, it’s frankly a miracle that anyone even stays awake long enough to watch the ball drop on TV. It’s true; we’re just that exciting. I should really just speak for myself though, given that not even the finest glass of sparkling champagne would strike my fancy, while others would gladly partake.

Why on earth is it that fewer people are interested in making non-alcoholic cocktails for us lightweights and cheap dates over here? Seems to me a gross oversight, excluding such a large portion of thirsty consumers when it takes no more effort to just exclude the booze. Inspired by Zevia‘s call to arms, I wanted to take this opportunity to try out their new Tonic Water and lift a glass to 2015 in style. Bitter, astringent stuff by itself, this stevia-sweetened bubbly brew makes an uncanny substitute for the traditional mix of cognac and champagne typically found in a French 75. Authenticity be damned, I’m just happy to finally have a respectable drink to toast with when the clock strikes midnight.

With that, I want to wish everyone out there in all corners of the world a very Happy New Year! May it be the best one yet.

Zevia Faux 75
Adapted from The New York Times

2 Tablespoons Light Agave Nectar
1/4 Cup Fresh Lemon Juice
1 (12-Ounce Can) Zevia Tonic Water
2 Strips of Lemon Zest (Optional, for Garnish)

Shake the agave and lemon juice vigorously in a cocktail shaker until thoroughly blended. Divide the mixture between two champagne flutes and top with equal amounts of the tonic water. Garnish with lemon zest for some extra festive flair, if desired.

Makes 2 Drinks

Printable Recipe


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Soda Satisfaction

There’s a silent soda war going on behind those shiny metallic cans, and it’s not just between the titans of industry, Pepsi and Coke. No, this battle is at the root of every fizzy solution, bubbling up to the surface every time the classic question of sweetness is posed. Should “diet” sodas merely strive to maintain the status quo, sticking with the traditional formulation of artificial sweeteners that may or may not be even worse than sugar or even high-fructose corn syrup, or could there be something better still out there? Zevia is one company bold enough face that controversial query head-on, producing zero-calorie carbonated beverages in a rainbow of natural colors that eschew the classic chemical cocktail that most brews rely on.

It was love at first sip so many years ago, and you’ll rarely find my pantry stocked with fewer than three different varieties at a time. Now, when I heard that they were switching up the foundation, adding an innovative new sweetener into the mix, I was alarmed. Would my beloved Zevia still taste as good, or would this story turn into a modern retelling of New Coke?

Offering the same lineup of flavors I’ve come to know and love, now monk fruit extract, the newest all-natural non-caloric sweetener, has been invited to the party. Stevia and erythritol round out the sugarless foundation, a trio that Zevia as dubbed “SweetSmart.” Strongly resistant to change in general and repelled by the concept at first, it seemed like crazy talk to merely suggest tampering with the formula. Why fix what isn’t broken? Zevia has been the only soda in my fridge for a number of years now, so surely any variation in that familiar flavor could only weaken the brand.

Dispelling that notion with just one big, fizzy slurp, I couldn’t be happier that my assumptions were proven wrong. Sure, family and friends had sometimes remarked that the bubbly elixir was too sharp and not nearly sweet enough for their palates, but these were comments brushed off as unfair comparisons. No, a so-called “diet” soda wouldn’t have the same addictive sugary rush as a corn syrup-sweetened can of conventional soda, although now I see the validity in that point. The new and improved Zevia sodas are distinctly smoother, less harsh and acidic, while placing a greater emphasis on the underlying flavors. That allows the beverages to impart a sweeter taste without actually veering off into liquid candy territory.

Just as good as before, and yet somehow better than ever? Now that’s a sweet change that I can fully embrace!

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